No plan survives contact with the enemy... - Page 5
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Thread: No plan survives contact with the enemy...

  1. #41
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Edmonton
    Posts
    58

    Feb 1, 2017 (effective)

    Don't have much to say this month. Made a wallop of cash (almost, but not quite, embarrassed about how good the quarter was given the economy around here). This needs to be invested, but haven't had time to even think about investing it and balancing the portfolio. Pretty dull month financially because of not getting around to doing anything. Anyhow, for posterity:

    Assets
    TFSA 1: $46,600 ($100 monthly contribution)
    TFSA 2: $13,400 (no contributions, todo list for this week is to make my contribution here)
    RRSP: $85,700 (no contributions)
    Non-Registered (CAD): $64,700 (no contributions)
    Non-Registered (USD): U$390 (no contributions)
    Savings Account 1: $4,200, (anticipated rent for tomorrow)
    Savings Account 2: $340

    Corporate Current Account: $19,700
    Corporate Investment Account: $151,500. (35,000 contribution)

    Liabilities
    Margin Loan: $13,400
    MasterCard: $1,500 (revolving balance, paid monthly)
    Visa: $0
    Lines of Credit: $0
    Corporate MasterCard: $200 (revolving balance, paid monthly)
    Corporate Line of Credit $0

    Estimated net worth is now $371,800 (+$48,000).

    Last edited by Sm5; 2017-01-31 at 10:27 PM.

  2. #42
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Edmonton
    Posts
    58

    March 1, 2017

    Don't have much to say this month either. Markets had quite a run up this month, filled up my TSFA and paid my corporate taxes, which were less than expected - meaning personal ones will be higher come April but still estimating a small refund. Trying to decide whether I want to increase my leverage (given what looks like an ongoing stock rally) or decrease it (given the uncertainty I'm seeing), probably will just stay the course though with the minor amount of leverage I'm holding currently. Otherwise, a boring month financially.

    Assets
    TFSA 1: $47,800 ($100 monthly contribution)
    TFSA 2: $18,100 ($4,300 contributed)
    RRSP: $89,800 (no contributions)
    Non-Registered (CAD): $65,700 (no contributions)
    Non-Registered (USD): U$400 (no contributions)
    Savings Account 1: $5,900, (anticipated rent for tomorrow)
    Savings Account 2: $270

    Corporate Current Account: $7,300
    Corporate Investment Account: $154,800. ($1,000 contribution, USD$2,000 withdrawn)

    Liabilities
    Margin Loan: $13,400
    MasterCard: $1,000 (revolving balance, paid monthly)
    Visa: $0
    Lines of Credit: $0
    Corporate MasterCard: $110 (revolving balance, paid monthly)
    Corporate Line of Credit $0

    Estimated net worth is now $375,740 (+$4,000).

  3. #43
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Edmonton
    Posts
    58

    April 1, 2017

    Well, the last month the markets went on a bit of a tear for most of the month, but the correction ate most of my gains. Spending was a bit high as some items came up on the cards from a recent and much needed vacation. I've been putting some thought into goals for this year, I'm going to try to:
    1) reduce spending and increase savings by not eating out as much;
    2) working a bit more than I currently am (damn economy makes it difficult),
    3) attempt to hit a net worth of $500,000 by year's end;
    4) contribute maximum to RRSP and TFSA; and
    5) attempt to contribute $100,000 to accounts this year (been a bit below that the last few years, so far, YTD, I've contributed about $38000 so I think this is doable).

    This will all be a bit of a stretch, but we will see if its possible.


    Assets
    TFSA 1: $48,400 ($100 monthly contribution)
    TFSA 2: $19,000 (no contributions)
    RRSP: $91,500 (no contributions, once taxes are done and I know what my contribution limit is for the year I'll contribute here)
    Non-Registered (CAD): $65,400 ($250.00 contribution, just some cash I had floating around and needed to get rid of somewhere)
    Non-Registered (USD): U$400 (no contributions)
    Savings Account 1: $7,600
    Savings Account 2: $100


    Corporate Current Account: $7,400
    Corporate Investment Account: $157,600. (no contributions)

    Liabilities
    Margin Loan: $13,100
    MasterCard: $1,600 (revolving balance, paid monthly, high from vacation expenses)
    Visa: $0
    Lines of Credit: $0
    Corporate MasterCard: $300 (revolving balance, paid monthly)
    Corporate Line of Credit $0

    Estimated Net Worth is now at $382,500.00 (+$6,700)


    Rate of Return
    Rates of return so far are:
    Non-registered CAD, (heavily Canadian financials) at +2.556% return (10.91% annualized); TFSA 1 (balanced in its own right) is at 2.378% (10.12% annualized); TFSA 2 (global small cap) is at 8.466% (39.55% annualized); RRSP (foreign / USA) is 5.678% (25.42% annualized), and corporate investment account (global / US) is at 4.593% (20.22% annualized), which gives an overall investment return of +4.437% year to date (19.49% annualized).

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  5. #44
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Edmonton
    Posts
    58

    May 1, 2017

    Quite month financially again, got very busy at work (hopefully can keep up this increased workload) and as such didn't get a chance to do much of anything else. Got a small tax refund ($200.00) which suggests payroll deductions are right where they should be (happy with that) and have taken a quarterly draw of just around my RRSP contribution amount in addition to my usual drawings - so that is in the process of moving over to the RRSP once the cheque clears the various banks. This will go into US index fund to get it to the point where it starts DRIPing again. With the recent increase in US stock prices, it currently does not generate enough for a Unit per quarter so although this will push my asset allocation out of whack a bit, I'll be allocating it this way. Further funds throughout the year will be used to draw back the asset allocation closer to targets as this will put me about 10% high on US and 10% low on Canadian from my target.

    Hopefully, this is not the wrong play, but it would just be nice to get the RRSP DRIP operating again.

    Contributed $250 against margin account and am a bit on the fence about paying this down in the short term. Markets are high, and the interest rate is starting to creep up, but this is such a minor amount outstanding that I'm indifferent to letting it roll or paying it down (either by turning off DRIPs for a while in that account or by paying new money in to cover), we will see what is decided in the long run.


    Assets
    TFSA 1: $49,400 ($100 monthly contribution)
    TFSA 2: $20,300 (no contributions)
    RRSP: $95,500 (no contributions; funds on the way over in about a week once the cheque clears)
    Non-Registered (CAD): $65,100 ($250.00 contribution, just some cash to get rid of)
    Non-Registered (USD): U$400 (no contributions)
    Savings Account 1: $5,900
    Savings Account 2: $26,300 (moving to RRSP)
    USD Savings Account: $1,700


    Corporate Current Account: $7,700
    Corporate Investment Account: $164,100. (no contributions)

    Liabilities
    Margin Loan: $12,800
    MasterCard: $1,000 (revolving balance, paid monthly, high from vacation expenses)
    Visa: $0
    Lines of Credit: $0
    Corporate MasterCard: $200 (revolving balance, paid monthly)
    Corporate Line of Credit $0

    Estimated Net Worth is now at $419,300 (+$36,800) - anticipating for tomorrows rent.

  6. #45
    Super Moderator
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    Nov 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sm5 View Post
    Rates of return so far are: . . . TFSA 2 (global small cap) is at 8.466% (39.55% annualized); RRSP (foreign / USA) is 5.678% (25.42% annualized), and corporate investment account (global / US) is at 4.593% (20.22% annualized)
    So you're getting
    39.55% annual return in global small caps,
    25.42% annual return in foreign/USA,
    20.22% annual return in global/USA

    These are outlandishly high performances and far above index returns for those sectors. Can you share with us what your exposures are?

    You mentioned you work in the legal field related to M&A. Are you sure that your investments are free from conflict of interest/insider trading? The very high returns raise some flags.
    Last edited by james4beach; 2017-04-29 at 04:53 PM.

  7. #46
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    Nov 2014
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    Totally conflict free - I represent private businesses and have no financial stake in any of them or any marketable knowledge at all, none are publicly listed/traded. Just some luck in the market timing and leverage effects is all it is, not really anything special. If the markets go down, likely I will go down even further.

    Biggest exposures are:
    Global small caps - Mawer global small cap fund
    Global large cap is mixed: mostly Mawer again, some PH&N funds, plus BEP, XEF (market timing a bit on this on events like Brexit, Trump, etc.)
    USA is just IVV, CLU, and a few small amounts in mutual funds for when distributions come in (a few hundred bucks here and there).

    Your rates of return estimates may be a bit out though. I don't track based on asset class but based on accounts and there are, at times, some mis-allocated funds in accounts so where I refer to one as global/small cap it mostly would be that but also could be holding US (for example). However, on that basis, based on my numbers, I'm seeing (as of today):

    Margin account (primarily Canadian banks, but does have some US holdings): 6.49% annualized (2.035% YTD)
    Balanced TFSA: 13.74% annualized (4.213% YTD)
    International TFSA: 59.71% annualized (16.192% YTD) - This is just holding a Mawer fund currently, for example.
    RRSP (International and US funds) 36.12% annualized (10.389% YTD)
    Corporate holdings (mostly international small cap / US index but a few Canadian holdings, TD for example was bought on the 'scandal' dip): 31.22% annualized, 9.101% YTD.

    Annualized since Jan 1, 2014, on all accounts in only 14.42% return.

    Nothing to write home about. No insider knowledge. Just luck and leverage.

  8. #47
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    3,852
    If the "annualized" rate is based on YTD then Sm5 returns don't look "outlandishly high". My son started investing this year (via XIC and XAW) and his "annualized" gain is ~35%. Meaningless but high.

  9. #48
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    Thanks for sharing your exposures! If you started a thread in Investments, I'm sure many people would be interested in learning about how you're investing. Those look like some nice vehicles you've chosen.

    Oh, is that annualized rate just based on the YTD performance? That makes sense... not a very useful measure, by the way.

    Annualized since Jan 1, 2014, on all accounts in only 14.42% return.
    Ah, I see!

    I thought you were showing your CAGR (compounding annual growth rate) over the life time of your investment, and I was about to say that if you're getting 20% to 25% annual rate of return over several years, that you should quit law and start a hedge fund
    Last edited by james4beach; 2017-04-29 at 11:39 PM.

  10. #49
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    Just YTD annualized as mordko surmises.

    I have the lifetime numbers and each account ranges from 9.88% - 15.37% lifetime CAGR (over everything 14.42% as stated above). I'd love for it to be in the 20-25% range(!), as would anyone, but sadly returns aren't quite that good.


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