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Thread: Amazon buys Whole Foods

  1. #21
    Senior Member humble_pie's Avatar
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    i'm not sure why getting a routine order delivered in 24 hours or less matters, but i note that it appears to matter deeply to ltr & aRed, so i'm willing to accept that fast delivery is important to some people.

    which are the businesses that are going to benefit from Del to Door? firstly, corrugated cardboard, as in boxes & cartons. Pulp companies could benefit.

    then we have a lot of delivery vans running around. Most of them appear to be running on gasoline. I'm not seeing diesel delivery vans but maybe that's because i'm in crowded congested downtown. Still, the carbon emissions are serious. This is not good.

    do i want to be walking around a city district that has drones criss-crossing only a metre above my head, all clutching cartons in their forceps that are destined to be delivered to my neighbours?


  2. #22
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    It does not matter one iota... Just saying fast delivery is not the exclusive domain of Amazon. I wouldn't pay a penny extra for expedited shipping either and I don't participate in Amazon Prime.

    Per HP, I too wonder of the climate change effects...albeit the FedEx truck making several deliveries may be less mileage than everyone running to the mall individually. You want packaging? Buy ITP or CCL. You want to participate in distribution warehousing? Buy AAR.UN or its competitors.

  3. #23
    Senior Member humble_pie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AltaRed View Post
    It does not matter one iota... Just saying fast delivery is not the exclusive domain of Amazon. I wouldn't pay a penny extra for expedited shipping either and I don't participate in Amazon Prime.

    Per HP, I too wonder of the climate change effects...albeit the FedEx truck making several deliveries may be less mileage than everyone running to the mall individually. You want packaging? Buy ITP or CCL. You want to participate in distribution warehousing? Buy AAR.UN or its competitors.

    good stuff! i'm glad you're staying true to form & not being fooled into paying more just to get it on tuesday instead of wednesday ...

    i imagine the FedEx truck is somewhat more efficient - ie less gas - than many shoppers all wondering off to the malls on their own.

    re food, just about everybody knows the advantages of bio farm produce & slow cooking/slow food by now.

    but lately i've discovered there's a slow clothing movement. These folks are weaving their own cloth, sewing their own clothes. It seems to be an offshoot of advanced knitting, where the knitters either own their own sheep or else they know who sheared the animals. They spin their own wool yarns from the fleeces.

    a cornerstone of the slow clothing movement is that one should actually possess very few clothes at any one time. It's an inevitable consequence of the fact that the clothing items, themselves, are quite painstaking to fabricate. The fact that slow clothing is also frugal & beneficial to the environment are sidebar plusses.

    slow clothing is the opposite of the consumption economy. It also means that artful mending has suddenly become extremely fashionable.
    .



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  5. #24
    Senior Member m3s's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrewf View Post
    Maybe I'm weird, but I will seldom pay a penny premium for faster shipping. I regularly use the free super saver shipping and get it in under two days... This is why Prime is a waste of money, especially in Canada where we don't get any of the other perks.
    Prime video has been available to Canadians since last fall. I never pay extra for shipping but I signed up for Prime mainly because they reunited the original Top Gear presenters (I could never pay for Top Gear if I wanted to before) Prime shipping usually takes 3 days to get to the outer edge of civilization, but it is the most consistent online shipping I've experienced and I've been shopping online since eBay started. It's also the most convenient to self manage (easily change, cancel, add to orders before they ship etc) Refunds are also extremely easy - in my experience they just send a replacement etc

    By comparison I recently ordered from another Canadian website and a few days later a CSR calls me at work because something was out of stock even though the website said otherwise. Now I have to come up with something else on the spot and turns out things the website listed as out of stock are actually in stock and they have to get my Visa numbers again and do an adjustment and send an email to follow up.. Similar experiences from other websites where I had to call in to make a simple change, which in turn messed up their packer and I had to call back later to get it sorted out etc. Amazon is never like this.

    The USA is about 5 years ahead of Canada in online shopping and always has been. Most Canadian online shopping is watered down copy cats of US websites. I've been getting US shipments made to friends or hotels for over a decade and only recently has that become really mainstream, the last hotel was the first time I saw a room dedicated to online parcels (vast majority were amazon Prime parcels by the way) I agree with you there isn't much point paying for Prime, it should get you an additional 5% discount or something. Amazon isn't always the cheapest but I find it the most reliable and convenient experience.
    amat victoria curam

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by humble_pie View Post
    i'm not sure why getting a routine order delivered in 24 hours or less matters, but i note that it appears to matter deeply to ltr & aRed, so i'm willing to accept that fast delivery is important to some people.............

    ..............then we have a lot of delivery vans running around. Most of them appear to be running on gasoline. I'm not seeing diesel delivery vans but maybe that's because i'm in crowded congested downtown. Still, the carbon emissions are serious. This is not good.
    HP, not many are blessed with your patience. It's a great virtue to possess. Generally though, a high value is placed on fast delivery. It's really the only attribute left that all the wannabees haven't mastered. The products at Amazon aren't that unique, as every company has access to basically the same products. A secure site isn't that unique, as everyone has access to that software today. What makes Amazon and a few others so unique, is that they have developed the massive robotic and worker fulfillment centers to facilitate almost instant delivery.

    Ask someone why they like a particular online shop and the answer will usually be something like, "I clicked it in the afternoon and had the darn thing the next morning - amazing".

    Amazons attention and awareness of this requirement is what will allow them to have a chance at success in the food delivery business. I just haven't decided if it will be accepted by people or not. I guess we'll see. If we all had patience, we wouldn't mind clicking a bag of oranges and getting them a week later, but speed is going to be especially important when it comes to food.

    With regard to excess carbon emissions, some may argue that this model will reduce emissions as each delivery would have precipitated a car trip to the store and back, where a single trip with many packages in a truck would be better. Think of everyone using their car to get to work compared to a bus driving them all.

    ltr

  7. #26
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    Very seldom do I buy things online I don't need it immediately. I will choose cheaper delivery over exceedingly quick. Amazon is spending heavily on fast delivery, I'm not sure it is a sustainable way to profitability.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by like_to_retire View Post
    Loblaws has already been experimenting over the last year or so with online ordering of food at my local store. It's called Click and Collect.

    ltr
    I started using Loblaws app...rocks hard I love it. Produce is better than that available in the store...just call them that you're outside you get the goods in a minute...thats why you never see cars parked there...they're home already while the rest are playing shopping cart rodeo.
    Last edited by Eder; 2017-06-18 at 09:03 PM.

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by AltaRed View Post
    Things can come quick from Costco online too. I ordered a monitor one late Monday afternoon. It was at my front door less than 24 hrs later. The order was processed in Richmond, BC and shipped that evening on the overnight Fedex truck to Kelowna...and on the delivery van the next morning (theoretically could have been delivered at 9am if I had been the van's first stop.
    I just ordered from Cabela's online the other day...free shipping ...boom ...fly rod & Garmin Explorer shows up in 2 days at my daughters door, much better price than Amazon.ca. Amazon seems easily emulated.

  10. #29
    Senior Member m3s's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eder View Post
    Amazon seems easily emulated.
    There is way more to amazon than shipping...

    I find that amazon is more like the google of online shopping - it's very intuitive to find what you're looking for quickly. Best selling and reviewed items rise to the top but like google there is a lot of magic going on under the hood. amazon's online popularity means items have more stats and verified reviews and the more useful reviews rise to the top. It also shows items that others with similar shopping patterns viewed or purchased etc.

    amazon is the first place I ever bought cheap mundane items online. I don't want to waste much if any time cross shopping or researching small ticket items. From the moment I realise I want any small ticket item I can usually find a better item for less on amazon faster than if I went to walmart/sears/target etc and find the aisle and then compare a few items with no knowledge of what sells better or what the reviews are etc.

    I've been buying big ticket items online for over a decade and I still go to niche websites for the big ticket items. If I was buying a GPS I would probably go to gpscity.ca first because they are known for gps in Canada but then I would cross shop a few places online because it's a relatively big ticket item and I will spend some time shopping around and researching etc. The vast majority of what I buy on amazon are under $50 and rarely over $100

    When I go to most web stores like costco items have like 3 reviews. They're more like Lycos or webcrawler or something pre-google
    amat victoria curam

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by like_to_retire View Post
    ... Loblaws has already been experimenting over the last year or so with online ordering of food at my local store. It's called Click and Collect.

    I was keenly interested when I saw the four designated parking places that are painted red in my Loblaws lot where you can pick up your order after ordering your groceries online. I made a mental note to check out those spots every week when I went to shop the old fashion way with my cart, because it must be incredibly more convenient to click on your groceries online and then drive to the store and pick them up rather than the horror of pushing a cart around the store and actually scrutenizing your own vegetables and fruit inside the store. Sheesh.

    Well, maybe Loblaws will have a different story, but my "on the ground" survey reveals to me that I haven't seen a single car in the red zone yet!

    But maybe if you can click on your groceries and then have them show up at my door will actually work and be successful ...
    I haven't checked the parking pickup stops (how long does it take for the groceries to be put into one's car?). Inside Loblaws however, the storage room/bins where the groceries sit until one shows up to collect them have most of the time I checked looked like three quarters of the space full of groceries. It may be a regional thing but it seems to be used.

    Then too, WalMart is offering the same service (with designated pickup parking spots). My co-worker thinks it is a great improvement.


    Quote Originally Posted by like_to_retire View Post
    ... I do know that when I'm in the store I'm fairly particular about fruit and vegetables. I like this vegetable, but I won't accept the one directly beside it. Who will now be be making these decsions for me at Amazon - a robot?
    Same problem for Amazon, Loblaws, WalMart and the older services circa 1999 that delivered groceries to one's door (http://www.canadiangrocer.com/top-st...-gateway-29761).

    I can see where if a truck takes the returns, it might be okay but for drive up places - I wouldn't want to be returning stuff.


    Cheers


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