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Thread: The psychology of retiring

  1. #31
    Senior Member Daniel A.'s Avatar
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    Retirement is a process, in my case I'd worked for 39 years in that time I was out of work for a total of 6 weeks.
    After so many years of time commitment to wake up and realize I could do anything I wanted no more working shifts being awake at 3-4 am.
    In the first three years of retirement I would not make any time commitments, I slowly realized how much of life I'd put into the company things I didn't need to do anymore.
    Funny thing is when we are absorbed in routine we don't see the forest for the trees, I'd never really seen the politics until I left, so much energy helping make a company successful, going to work even when I didn't feel well, trying to schedule family life around work. Its been seven years now and I don't miss anything about work.


  2. #32
    Senior Member kcowan's Avatar
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    Trying to leave an organization on autopilot seldom works. You need to think of your departure as death because it is to the organization.

    Do what you can while you can and then move on without looking back!

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomB19 View Post
    It's just the depressing March to the end. Differences of opinion seem more petty. I leave 20 minutes after the end of the day and walk past people, who I know will continue working for hours, and think, "if they only knew the futility of their effort...". In short, I'm a bad employee. Lol!
    I know for some it can actually be a freeing experience. It's like playing at the casino with house money. Someone raises a ridiculous idea because of a political reason, you can call them out on it, because what are they going to do, fire you? That idea you've had in your head for the last 5 years, but didn't want to bring up, because you were worried about fall out? Raise it up.

    Although you don't seem like the type to shy down from speaking your mind anyway, it can still be an interesting shift, that I've seen in some people retiring where they can be highly effective on their way out the door of being an agent of positive change.

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  5. #34
    Senior Member My Own Advisor's Avatar
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    "I know for some it can actually be a freeing experience. It's like playing at the casino with house money. "

    I could totally see that.

    In our organization, there is a request that you "speak your mind" and "be open and honest" but the reality is they don't want to hear what you have to say. You're sometimes shown the door if you do.

    .....so if you've ..... "seen in some people retiring where they can be highly effective on their way out the door of being an agent of positive change" then that's a great thing.
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  6. #35
    Senior Member atrp2biz's Avatar
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    I'll be temporarily retired in about a week. With the recent addition to the family, I'll be taking a paternity leave for the balance of the year. I'm not sure what to expect. My wife thinks I'll be extremely bored. I'm definitely excited about it. I was amused by the reactions I received when I informed colleagues about my intentions. A couple of old-school execs looked at me like a had a third eye. They were likely thinking "can't say that...can't say that..." so they just said it was great.

    I'm not sure what's in store for me when/if I return. Whatever happens, the next few months will likely provide me with greater clarity as to what is important in my life.

  7. #36
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    I walked away and never looked back. Hard at first because I was used to 12 hour days and phone calls at unsocial hours. Had lots to do with getting our house ready to sell, downsizing etc. Don't miss work at all. So very glad I went early rather than later.

  8. #37
    Senior Member olivaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic12 View Post
    Never understood why there would be bad dreams etc. ... unless one owned the business. I have had to do something physical to work out the "drop kick" desires but so far, these types of issues have never affected sleep/dreams.
    Difficult to explain. I did not own the business but I was part of the core management team. The company treated us unbelievably well and I came to view it as a sort of secondary family. I didn't dream about the job before I retired so I didn't expect to dream about it after I retired. I think the dreams had something to do with letting go of decades of stress, responsibility and self-doubt. The dreams lasted for roughly six months.


    Quote Originally Posted by kcowan View Post
    Trying to leave an organization on autopilot seldom works. You need to think of your departure as death because it is to the organization.

    Do what you can while you can and then move on without looking back!
    You're right, no organization can go on autopilot but a well run department can continue indefinitely after the loss of the department leader, IMO.

    Letting go without looking back is the healthy way to deal with it. I chose the other way - not intentionally.

    Last edited by olivaw; 2017-05-12 at 05:33 PM.
    If you have something to say - then say.

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