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Thread: The psychology of retiring

  1. #21
    Senior Member Beaver101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalgaryPotato View Post
    I think a lot depends on the workplace. Where I work, many people work after they have already earned a full pension. And many others, retire with the full pension, and then return to work a few months later, and work for many more years while collecting their pension.
    ... so where do you work? other than guessing it's in Calgary ... I would love to work there provided it's not a bank.

    Everyone should be respected as an individual, but no one idolized.-A. Einstein

  2. #22
    Senior Member pwm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beaver101 View Post
    ... so where do you work? other than guessing it's in Calgary ... I would love to work there provided it's not a bank.
    I had the same question. What job is so excellent that someone would keep working at it if they didn't have to?

  3. #23
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    If it is being opened up beyond the MegaCorp cubicle farm, my brother-in-law's barber took about five years to follow through on his accountant's recommendation that he would do better financially by retiring then selling the building.

    Based on the number of people who are on multiple boards as well as a full time occupation such as farmer or university prof or retired premier or PM that I read on annual reports, some of them must enjoy the role.

    Our current DBA at work doesn't see every stopping working ... just cutting back to a more limited consulting role.


    Cheers

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  5. #24
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    I really appreciate the discussion in this thread. Thank you to every one of you.

    To be clear, I wasn't asking for financial advice. Also, there is nothing wrong with my work or my employer. For what I do, there is not a better employer or work environment.

    It's just the depressing March to the end. Differences of opinion seem more petty. I leave 20 minutes after the end of the day and walk past people, who I know will continue working for hours, and think, "if they only knew the futility of their effort...". In short, I'm a bad employee. Lol!

    To be fair, I am doing work that is important to the company and I have been documenting every aspect of my job and really everything in the department for months. They will be left in good shape.

    I harken back to my early days in the industry and recall savoring every moment of the day and extra time I out in. It was glorious and I would have done it for free.

    You folks are a great support group. Thank you for sharing the insight.

  6. #25
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    Not a worry in the world cept is the tide gonna hit my chair...grats on choosing the blue pill!

  7. #26
    Senior Member GreatLaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomB19 View Post
    To be fair, I am doing work that is important to the company and I have been documenting every aspect of my job and really everything in the department for months. They will be left in good shape.
    Hmph. My ex-employer had no policy or process at all for documenting people's knowledge or procedures when they left.

    My former manager sent me a message asking if I had some time to answer some questions. I knew through the grapevine he needed it for an important request for quotation.
    My answer: I'm not willing to provide free services to Zxxx. My contract rate is $100/hr with a 40 hour minimum.
    Dumb@$$e$
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  8. #27
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    ^^^^

    Sometimes the policy is great on paper but between other priorities and replacements that figure "if person X could do it, I can figure it out without documentation".


    One of the more ironic situations was the guy who was upset at his manager enough to find another job then quit. When the knowledge documentation schedule he had planned out was interrupted, he was livid. I asked him why he was letting it get to him as from my POV, as long as he documented that the shift was management's decision - why did he care?

    He could go the $140 an hour, 40 hour minimum route if anything came up later.

    I don't think it was as calming as I would have liked but as he was already on his way out, I didn't see why he would waste some much time & energy getting his shorts in a knot.


    Cheers

  9. #28
    Senior Member olivaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomB19 View Post
    I really appreciate the discussion in this thread. Thank you to every one of you.

    To be clear, I wasn't asking for financial advice. Also, there is nothing wrong with my work or my employer. For what I do, there is not a better employer or work environment.

    It's just the depressing March to the end. Differences of opinion seem more petty. I leave 20 minutes after the end of the day and walk past people, who I know will continue working for hours, and think, "if they only knew the futility of their effort...". In short, I'm a bad employee. Lol!

    To be fair, I am doing work that is important to the company and I have been documenting every aspect of my job and really everything in the department for months. They will be left in good shape.

    I harken back to my early days in the industry and recall savoring every moment of the day and extra time I out in. It was glorious and I would have done it for free.

    You folks are a great support group. Thank you for sharing the insight.
    Your situation sounds eerily similar to what I faced in my final work year before retirement. My employer was great so I did everything that I could to manage the transition.

    I didn't reply sooner because I was unable to manage my final months in a healthy manner.

    As a department head, my initial goal was to make sure that my department could run on autopilot indefinitely. That involved delegation and documentation. It was boring but I stayed engaged by reminding myself that it was for the good of a company that had treated me very well.

    Then we hired my replacement. I had hoped to spend the final three months showing him the ropes but it didn't work out. Our approaches were too different. I was a traditional technical type who had risen to a leadership role. He was a gregarious type of individual. Budgets, plans and implementation schedules were not something that interested him. It wasn't so much that we disagreed on the approach as that he didn't see such things as relevant to the role. It became .... awkward ....and not awkward in the healthy way either. Awkward in the unhealthy way where you try to remain polite and professional while stuffing the desire to drop kick somebody across the office. Awkward in the way that you start muttering to yourself on the drive home. Awkward in the way that you find yourself repeating the serenity prayer on an ongoing basis.

    Strange as this sounds, I had the occasional bad dreams about it for months after my retirement date. The bad dreams ended after my replacement "resigned".

    So yeah Tom. Don't listen to a word that I have to say on this topic. I am the poster child for how NOT to manage the final months before retirement.
    Last edited by olivaw; 2017-05-10 at 01:57 PM.
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  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreatLaker View Post
    I don't understand people that say they cannot retire because they don't have 35 years or 85 points in a DB plan so they will not get a full pension. To me that's asking the wrong question. They should be asking if they have enough to retire on, given a good understanding of projected retirement expenses and a conservative assessment of expected investment returns plus a reasonable safety factor. But most of them probably have never run the numbers or even thought about it much, so they feel if they have a full pension it will be enough to retire on.

    It's like being in a restaurant and refusing to stop eating until you have finished everything on your plate even though you are stuffed, don't need the excess calories and will feel awful.
    That's because some of the penalty for taking an early pension is quite severe depending on the workplace. For example, at my father's workplace before he retired, if you're short 1 year, etc, you would only get 60% of full pension that he would have been entitled to which is a steep penalty. He was also thinking of protecting my mother as she would only get 65% of the pension that my father was getting should he pass away. So instead of $50,000 pension (making up numbers here) he would get for full pension, he would get only $30,000 because he was one day short of the necessary requirements. Then if he passed away, my mother would only get $19,500 (65% of $30,000) which is not enough for her for her medical needs.
    Sometimes, employees are thinking long-term and need to work longer. Just giving you my perspective.

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomB19 View Post
    ... To be clear, I wasn't asking for financial advice. Also, there is nothing wrong with my work or my employer. For what I do, there is not a better employer or work environment.
    It's just the depressing March to the end. Differences of opinion seem more petty ...
    What has usually helped me is similar situations is to book time doing stuff I want to do that is also of company benefit that is separate from whatever the irritation points. Knowing yourself is key.


    Quote Originally Posted by olivaw View Post
    ... Then we hired my replacement. I had hoped to spend the final three months showing him the ropes but it didn't work out. Our approaches were too different ... It became .... awkward .... Awkward in the unhealthy way where you try to remain polite and professional while stuffing the desire to drop kick somebody across the office. Awkward in the way that you start muttering to yourself on the drive home. Awkward in the way that you find yourself repeating the serenity prayer on an ongoing basis.

    Strange as this sounds, I had the occasional bad dreams about it for months after my retirement date. The bad dreams ended after my replacement "resigned" ...
    Never understood why there would be bad dreams etc. ... unless one owned the business. I have had to do something physical to work out the "drop kick" desires but so far, these types of issues have never affected sleep/dreams.


    Cheers


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