Longevity Spinach (Gynura Procumbens) - Page 3
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Thread: Longevity Spinach (Gynura Procumbens)

  1. #21
    Senior Member humble_pie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrPPincer View Post
    The green comes from sunlight hitting the potatoes. Keep the potatoes out of the light and they'll be fine.
    https://www.fsai.ie/faq/green_potatoes.html
    http://www.snopes.com/food/ingredient/greenpotatoes.asp

    dang i like to keep a few potatoes on a sunny windowsill to ripen em


  2. #22
    Senior Member mrPPincer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by humble_pie View Post
    dang i like to keep a few potatoes on a sunny windowsill to ripen em
    Shouldn't be a problem; maybe just remember to have the bathroom window open a bit, and have a few extra rolls of TP set out if you serve your guests that delicious green potato salad
    a financial message board can cost you money.
    ^ bmoney, in TPH thread.

  3. #23
    Senior Member olivaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by humble_pie View Post
    folks there is disturbing news out there. Spinach is bad for you.

    spinach is one of those plants - like rhubarb - that has lots of oxylates. Oxylates bind with calcium in the blood to form a salt that is excreted.
    .
    You made me look humble. I love rhubarb so I was somewhat concerned but it turns out that the oxalates are in the leaves and not the stalk.

    Rhubarb and custard was a pretty common desert when I was young.
    If you have something to say - then say.

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  5. #24
    Senior Member humble_pie's Avatar
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    there are lots oxalates in rhubarb leaves. Enough to kill, if one consumes a large quantity every day. Did you get to the Wiki part about how some Brits died during WW I because wartime england was encouraging rhubarb leaf salads?

    but there are some oxalates in those delicious pink rhubarb stalks tout de meme.

    rhubarb roots are another story. Important plant part in traditional chinese medicine. I had this chinese classmate, he was so excited to see rhubarb plants in canada, he couldn't believe we were only cooking the pink stalks while discardng the truly valuable part of the growth which was the rootstock.


    PS i'm just joking around with the oxylate-belladonna-atropine stuff. Usually cmffers are great with jokes. But for some reason this thread remains deadly serious. Olivaw i'm counting on you to lighten it up.

    .

  6. #25
    Senior Member olivaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by humble_pie View Post
    PS i'm just joking around with the oxylate-belladonna-atropine stuff. Usually cmffers are great with jokes. But for some reason this thread remains deadly serious. Olivaw i'm counting on you to lighten it up.
    Serious business this forum lately - I think the looming peanut butter shortage, the great flood and the poisonous spinach has us on edge.
    If you have something to say - then say.

  7. #26
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    I appreciate the lessons I am receiving about rhubarb on this thread. I was heretofore unaware of the oxalates threat.

    Recently I discovered that we are not the best stewards of rhubarb. I happened to look out the window a few days ago and saw a tall stalk growing out of one of the plants, with flowers on it. So I turned to the internet to get info about whether that was a good thing, a bad thing or a neutral thing. To my chagrin, I learned that out rhubarb had "bolted" and that rhubarb allowed to bolt is a shameful thing. There is no use in closing the garden gate after the rhubarb has bolted.

    I expect any time now social workers from the office of the Director of Child, Family and Community Service and Public Rhubarb Guardian (an aspect of the community service role) will arrive to apprehend our rhubarb and place it in foster care under a temporary custody order. With a bit of luck, our plants will in time be returned, but under supervision.


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