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Thread: DYA

  1. #1
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    DYA

    I know small cap stocks are not big on this forum nor in my investment portfolio but I have done a TON of DD on this one and I feel it is pretty solid.

    http://www.dynacert.com/Default.aspx
    http://www.technologymarketwatch.com/dya.htm
    https://www.einpresswire.com/article...enhouse-gasses

    This explains how the technology works > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u_J_D0NS0BE&app=desktop

    It is a unit that is added onto a diesel vehicle and injects hydrogen into the air intake. It can be paid off in 3 years since it apparently doesn't cost more than 10K to buy. Pictures > http://imgur.com/Z3E2Uk0

    TSX uplisting is coming soon. Walmart and Loblaws are testing the unit. Third party testing has shown between 14-19% fuel savings.

    "HydraGenTM produces hydrogen and oxygen results in up to 19.2% reduction in fuel consumption, up to 40% emissions reductions of greenhouse gasses, and better than 65% reduction in particulate matter. Initially we are targeting class-8 trucks, the large tractors pulling trailers around the country – that’s a huge market, there’s over 15 million trucks just in the USA, and out of that ~2.5M of those are the class-8 trucks."

    " CE certification for its HydraGEN™ technology. Specifically, the models HG1 (Class 6-8 trucks), HG2 (Class 2-5 trucks, refrigerated trailers and shipping containers) and HG3 (diesel-powered ocean ships, locomotives and stationary generators) will all now carry the CE mark for shipments to clients within Europe."


  2. #2
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    Pretty cool, thanks for bringing to our attention.
    I don't do much of this type of investing, but maybe I'll take a small flyer in my TFSA once it trades on the TSX.

  3. #3
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    I would stay clear for two reasons:

    (1) In my opinion, these guys look to be in the "HHO vehicle electrolysis unit" business. That whole technology is a scam. Google "HHO scam" and you will get numerous hits. Read some and compare to the claims of this company.

    (2) Leaving aside that that HHO technology is fundamentally a go-nowhere proposition, there are many competitors in the same business. I do not see that these guys have a competitive moat that makes them any more likely to succeed than any other outfit in this business.

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  5. #4
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    1. This is different from HHO. HHO claims to make the energy directly from the hydrogen.

    This company says the hydrogen into the air intake of a diesel engine. The diesel explodes which ignites the hydrogen and voila. I am skeptical as well so I've been searching the web trying to find more about hydrogen injection. I will post my findings later when I am not on mobile/come to a better understanding.

    2. From my research I can not find a legitimate competition offering the same product. DYA comes with a in cabin display that shows how it is running and also records the fuel/ghg reduction that can be used for carbon credits. There is a patent pending for this tech.

    http://boostboxh2.com/ is likely the biggest competition in the sector. They do not offer the same tracking measures and the unit also draws 65amps where as DYA is 22amps.

    I the bump the last two days is because of the up coming budget.. peoole are hopefully there will be a mention of some how this unit gets some benefit from that.

    I view this as a boom or bust compan tbh. With that said how much can a company truly be making up these stats? Also having Walmart and Loblaws testing the units is a good sign since they would have had to show enough to get these companies to be at least interested. Passing the European standards also gives me a little more hope as well.

    We will see.. I have stop losses in place just Incase it nose dives. I would like to see if I can see the facility but I am traveling soon and will not have the time

  6. #5
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    I"M GOING ALL IN!!!

  7. #6
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    Hahaha.. I hope I don't sound like a pumper. Just I've read so much and needed to share my thoughts with internet strangers so if it does tank I won't have to awkwardly sit across from you at Christmas dinner

  8. #7
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    To my ear, the first paragraph of their fact sheet reads like standard recitation of the HHO story:

    HydraGen(TM) - our on demand electrolysis unit designed for internal
    combustion engines that supplies the air intake with hydrogen and oxygen
    gases. Results show increased fuel economy, increased torque, extended
    engine oil life and a reduction in emissions.
    http://www.dynacert.com/cmsAssets/do...anuary2017.pdf

    Unless they claim something different from the other stories along precisely the same lines, they are just as limited by the laws of thermodynamics. They certainly aren't saying things to distance or contrast their business from the general HHO scam landscape.

  9. #8
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    There's nothing new and amazing about co-firing propane and/or natural gas with diesel.

    Basically the theory is, the propane/natural gas improves the flamefront for the diesel to combust.

    Electrolysis is a very inefficient way of making hydrogen though (steam-based reformation is how its really done in industry on an industrial scale).

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark0f0 View Post
    There's nothing new and amazing about co-firing propane and/or natural gas with diesel.

    Basically the theory is, the propane/natural gas improves the flamefront for the diesel to combust.

    Electrolysis is a very inefficient way of making hydrogen though (steam-based reformation is how its really done in industry on an industrial scale).
    In this case of course, it is hydrogen that is being used to improve combustion. From what I could gather, part of their technology relates to the computer based controls that ensure that just the right amount of hydrogen is produced and injected.

    Steam reforming might be the preferred large scale process for hydrogen production. But H2 is also produced quite widely as a by product in other electrolysis processes , particular in the Chlor-Alkali industry. Production of hydrogen by electrolyzing water does not make sense on a large scale, especially if the electricity is supplied from fossil powered stations. However, it is an attractive process when power from renewable energy sources is used. Electrolytic production is very scalable, so can be used from very small to fairly large production rates.

    In this case, the process does not use hydrogen as an energy source and only a very small amount is required. As a result, only a very small electrolyzer is required with minimal energy use. The energy source is of course fossil based in that the power comes from the truck's engine. Hopefully the benefits far outweigh the small amount of power consumed. They could offset this by using solar panels on the trucks and I think I read that they may be considering this.

    What I like about this process, assuming the claims in reduced emissions and fuel consumption are true and can be substantiated, is that it reduces emissions at the source (inside the engine's cylinders). Present day diesel emission controls treat the exhaust. They require a small chemical plant to be built in! Several stages of catalysts, filtration and injection of urea solution.

    What I do not like about the company, is that it is just selling a retrofit for existing trucks and engines. No doubt quite a large market, but how about future sales? And, if this process is so good, will new trucks come with this or a similar process installed? And will it meet EPA emission requirements?

    I read about this quite a while back. But it is interesting and I will try and learn more.


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