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  1. #11
    Senior Member sags's Avatar
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    Hey Carver........if I already have a DTC is a mobility scooter tax deductible ?

    Last edited by sags; 2017-04-14 at 01:51 PM.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member carverman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sags View Post
    Whoever designed the bike paths in our city must have been drunk. They cross busy traffic lanes at intersections and some just stop at bridges and force the bikes to veer back into the traffic lanes. A "little here......a little there" bike lanes cause more problems than they solve.

    In Ontario, mobility scooters have few restrictions. The government advises people to ride them on sidewalks.

    No age restriction, registration, licence, insurance or helmet required.

    This model has a 3 hp German engine, travels 16 kms an hour and looks more comfortable than an e-bike.

    It also has a bad weather top........kind of cool looking 3 or 4 wheelers.

    http://www.scootercity.ca/product/sample-product-2-2/
    I have a Pride 4 wheel similar that I bought used about 5 yrs ago. It's a 24volt system with 2 x 50ah AGM batteries.
    With the large 10inch wheels it is good for rougher nature trails as well. Being classified as a mobilty scooter, I am permitted to use it on sidewalks, inside stores etc. it has an automatic electric brake
    that applies as soon as you take your hand off the forward/reverse paddles. It also has an anti-rollback
    automatic brake. Very safe on sidewalks or in dept stores.

    3Hp at 24volt is about 2200 watts.

    The e-bikes, I believe are restricted to a 500watt motor in Ontario and are not supposed to be used
    on sidewalks.
    Last edited by carverman; 2017-04-15 at 08:16 AM.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Beaver101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carverman View Post
    Yes. I helped to buy an electric bike for a friend of mine last year in Toronto. It was shipped to Ottawa at extra charge of course. ... post #4.
    ... wow, thanks for all that information - lots to absorb there. Still researching on model and best price. Since I'm looking into a lighter weight version (eg. from post #2) - pedal (?) and fly instead of the scooter-type version, some of that information doesn't apply. Now I'm debating on a foldable or not - easier to port up and into the house ... choices, choices, choices. But it's still alot of good information there and for one ... I had no idea there's no HST on e-bikes. What purchase doesn't have some sort of "T" these days. I can't think of any ...
    Everyone should be respected as an individual, but no one idolized.-A. Einstein

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  5. #14
    Senior Member carverman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sags View Post
    Hey Carver........if I already have a DTC is a mobility scooter tax deductible ?
    There is NO HST on mobilty vehicles for disabled in Ontario.

    The DTC is not necessary I believe, to buy one tax free as long as your doctor issues a prescription for one which is then submitted to CRA for the tax year.

    It can be used just like a wheelchair to be submitted to CRA.

    Scooter — the amount paid for a scooter that is used in place of a wheelchair.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/tax-ti...ider-1.1112685

    Wheelchair (and scooter batteries) is used a mobilty aid, are also allowed under the current CRA medical expense rules,
    but these items as replacements are NOT tax free.

    Batteries on average, depending on use, have to be replaced about every two years, but it also depends on the longest distance you want to travel in one day before recharging. If you travel 10km or more
    perday, every day for the spring/summer/fall, you may have to replace them more often.
    Last edited by carverman; 2017-04-16 at 04:52 PM.

  6. #15
    Senior Member carverman's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Beaver101;1550834]... wow, thanks for all that information - lots to absorb there. Still researching on model and best price. Since I'm looking into a lighter weight version (eg. from post #2) - pedal (?) and fly

    All e-bikes have to have pedal in Ontario to be considered e-bikes and legal. There are a few flolding light weight power assisted bikes out there that use a 36 volt battery and a 250watt motor. I suppose these can be accomdated a city bus if necessary.
    http://powerinmotion.ca/Products/Fol...8tfhoCkTbw_wcB

    Now I'm debating on a foldable or not - easier to port up and into the house ... choices, choices, choices. But it's still alot of good information there and for one ... I had no idea there's no HST on e-bikes. What purchase doesn't have some sort of "T" these days. I can't think of any ...
    The HST free is for Ontario, I believe. We did not get charged HST separately on the invoice
    for the Jenna.

    Q8: Can municipalities pass by-laws prohibiting e-bikes?

    Yes. Municipalities have the ability to prohibit where e-bikes may travel on roads, paths, trails and other property under their jurisdiction.
    http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/dri...cles-faq.shtml
    Now here's an interesting e-bike experience in Ontario.
    http://news.nationalpost.com/news/ca...r-broken-pedal

    “That kind of stuff gives e-bike riders a bad name,” he said. “When the officer stopped me, we were standing at the side of the road, and a guy drove down the sidewalk on an e-bike right past us.

    “I said to the cop, ‘Look at this guy.’ The officer said, ‘Don’t worry, I’ll get him later.
    So the moral of the story is:
    Obey all traffic rules.
    Don't ride an e-bike on the side walk, if a cop stops you, you may get a fine.
    Don't take the pedals off the e-bike..if necessary wait for the replacement pedal to be re-installed
    again.
    Always wear a helmet..$75 fine if caught without a helmet.
    Last edited by carverman; 2017-04-16 at 05:29 PM.

  7. #16
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    I have been wanting to get an e-bike but my partner thinks that this is not so safe after all. I have tried discussing how much of a convenience it would be to get one which I can use for work, ( I live in Langley by the way).

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by sags View Post
    E-bikes should ride on the sidewalks ...
    The arguments against riding on sidewalks are a joke.
    The law is that children under 10 can ride bicycles on sidewalks safely but adults can't ?

    Do you have a reference to the law that says it is legal for *anyone* to ride on the sidewalk?

    They don't understand that their bicycle is a vehicle and a vehicle is designed to ride on the roadway, he said.
    In fact, he said, many cyclists, including most under age 16, don't know the rules of the road as governed by the Ontario Highway Traffic Act and the Ottawa Traffic and Parking bylaw.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...fines-1.955804


    Quote Originally Posted by sags View Post
    The law is all over the place ... I don't know about other Provinces, but in Ontario the laws are a mess.
    I have yet to find a reference to the alleged exemption.

    http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/saf...e-safety.shtml
    http://www.walkandrollpeel.ca/cycling/where-legal.htm


    Cheers
    Last edited by Eclectic12; 2017-04-21 at 11:33 AM.

  9. #18
    Senior Member sags's Avatar
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    You have to look under municipal bylaws for your community.

    In your link, it says children under 10 should not ride on the road.

    Say "no" to under 10
    Children under 10 years of age should not ride their bikes on the road. Most children at this age have not developed the necessary motor skills and judgment to ride safely in traffic without adult supervision.


    According to City of Mississauga and City of Brampton by-laws, bikes with wheels greater than 50 cm (20 inches) in diameter are not permitted on city sidewalks unless:
    The sidewalk is part of a bicycle path, or the rider is directly crossing a sidewalk.
    Most children's bikes have wheels small enough to be allowed to cycle on sidewalks.
    These by-laws allow children to cycle on the sidewalk until they develop the skills to handle themselves safely in traffic.

    http://www.walkandrollpeel.ca/cyclin...l.htm#sidewalk

    In Toronto, their bylaw allows children 14 and under to ride on the sidewalk.

    Toronto City Council has adopted a staff report recommendation that Toronto's sidewalk cycling bylaw shall stipulate "no person age 14 and older may ride a bicycle on a sidewalk". The fine for an adult who rides a bicycle on a sidewalk shall be $60. The intent of this bylaw is to allow young children to cycle on the sidewalk while they learn to ride. This is a Toronto Municipal Code bylaw and so rules will vary in different communities across Ontario.

    http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/co...0071d60f89RCRD

    Just yesterday I had to drive across town. I went up the busiest road in city.......2 lanes going each way and it was raining.

    There was a long line of vehicles trying to get around a cyclist chugging up a steep hill. Cars weaving out into the other crowded lane to pass him then and back in again. There was nobody on the sidewalks on either side of the road. According to the MTO, drivers are allowed to cross a solid yellow line to weave around bicycles, but all the liability for an accident is on them. The fact there is an exemption to cross a solid line shows there is a problem with slow cyclists impeding traffic.

    To combine bicycles with cars, trucks, and buses on busy roads is a very bad idea. The roads weren't designed for bicycle lanes.

    Children can ride on sidewalks safely with pedestrians but adults can't manage it ? That makes no sense.

    As far as I am concerned, paying a $40 - $60 bylaw fine would be preferable to being run over by a vehicle.
    Last edited by sags; 2017-04-21 at 11:42 AM.
    Someone planted a tree a long time ago so I can sit in the shade.

  10. #19
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    Riding on the sidewalk is actually more dangerous for cyclists because cars coming out don't expect fast-moving vehicles on the sidewalk. Little kids learning to ride don't move as fast as adult cyclists. Also, my brother was struck by a car while riding on the sidewalk when we were kids, so even for kids it's not necessarily ideal. Then you add in the danger to pedestrians from cyclists trying to weave around them or being taken by surprise when a pedestrian steps to the side right in front of them.

    The road is the safest and best place for cyclists. Ideally, a bike lane will make it easy to share the road between cars and cyclists, but if none is available, the cyclist has the right to use the traffic lane. I understand it is annoying for cars but it's the best option available.

  11. #20
    Senior Member sags's Avatar
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    The DIY e-bike..........

    ebike.jpg

    Someone planted a tree a long time ago so I can sit in the shade.

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