Best places to retire in Canada for low budget snowbirds - Page 3
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Thread: Best places to retire in Canada for low budget snowbirds

  1. #21
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    Oliver has a hospital...I was born there. Its very expensive place to live now.


  2. #22
    Senior Member kcowan's Avatar
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    If you are looking for hot. dry and cheap. the prairies are good choices. Smaller towns outside major centers. Easy charter flights south in the winter. Make sure you are near a real hospital and not a referral center.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eder View Post
    Oliver has a hospital...I was born there. Its very expensive place to live now.
    The Oliver (South Okanagan General Hospital) has limited services (more like an Urgent Care Centre) albeit it does have Obstetrics, Radiology, etc.. The real hospital for anything more important like surgery is in Penticton, and for serious issues like cancer... Kelowna. Okanagan RE has gone up a lot but the further one goes out from Kelowna, the better it is, and the further from urban limits, the better it is.

    Keith is correct in that some shit town in the Prairies would be cheapest, especially in hamlets and villages that are almost all declining in population. Probably can rent a house there for its operating costs (taxes and insurance). Boarded up windows come as a free extra.

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  5. #24
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    You want cheap and good weather. You have little income and no money saved after 62 years.

    So you are not talking about retiring, you are talking primarily about surviving through good fortune and the goodwill of others.

    I suggest you stay in Vancouver, or possibly Victoria where you don't face as severe a winter climate. There you can sleep in the parks and not face rental, heating or utility bills, and it fits your free spirit style. I'm not sure how competitive the dumpster diving is - hopefully you are an early riser.

  6. #25
    Senior Member tygrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kcowan View Post
    If you are looking for hot. dry and cheap. the prairies are good choices. Smaller towns outside major centers. Easy charter flights south in the winter. Make sure you are near a real hospital and not a referral center.
    Have you seen a prairie winter yet? The middle of the continent is where 2 weather systems are always fighting each other hence extreme weather. Harsh winters in the North, tornadoes, humidity etc in the south.

    I think the only place that meets the weather criteria is Vancouver Island, like up toward Comox or Courtney. Not too terrible expensive yet, still amenities and yet very hospitable weather. I didnt find the island too humid. And its the best winters by far. All the rain rolls up into vancouver and the island can be clearer and a degree warmer usually.

  7. #26
    Senior Member dubmac's Avatar
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    Smile

    I agree with the posts -Osoyoos +1, Prairie Town=+1. these are appealing.

    The OP says that he would like to avoid humid locales in the peak of summer "Summers hot but not humid would be ideal. Some breeze would be nice." I mentioned Peterborough (& places among the Kawarthas) for the following reason:

    1. Cheap: likely in the 8/10 range for meeting expectations. Ideally, you would want a place on or near a lake - which my drive price up. There are gorgeous little towns nearby - but these are very quiet, hobbit-like villages. (You will not need to ask neighbors to turn their stereo's down!.)
    2. Vegetarian-friendly: (7/10). you would likely be able to grow a little garden there. Many farmer's markets in summer.
    3. Good weather: This is the about the only variable that may not meet your requirement. Winters can be nasty, but then, IMO - I'd get out an do some X-country skiing, skating on open frozen lakes and enjoying what is available rather than lamenting what is not! Also - I'd consider going the Fla for a spell for a month in February.
    4. Business friendly: ("Not a depressed economy, so I can operate a seasonal business or get a part-time job.") I think there would be ample opportunity to set up a lil business.
    5. College or university town: Trent University and other community colleges are close by.
    6. Cultural: (historic buildings, live theatre, film and music festivals, etc.) Depends on your expectations. they have a token theatre guild, music festivals, wine festivals (but nothing like kelowna!)
    7. Cosmopolitan but English-speaking: Check!
    8. Religious: Check!
    ...also...
    9. Well established hospital: Check!

    Another part of the Canada that has rec'd some attention for retirees/boomers running away from Toronto is St. Catharines, Ontario. My brother live there.

    Real estate/rent is quite reasonable. LOTS of arts/culture (Niagara-on-the-lake), wine festivals etc., summers can be humid, but the breeze from lake does help to temper the humidity to some extent. Brock University would supply the need for a university. Has a few very new and very good hospitals.
    It does, however, have its share of dysfunction with a rust-belt (GM plant closures) employment scenario. There are challenges, in the downtown area, with drugs etc.


    I also thought about Elliot Lake - a small mining town in N. Ont. that closed 30 years ago and looked to set itself up as a "retiree haven" replete with hospitals and houses for 35K https://www.realtor.ca/Residential/S...Ontario-P5A2P7. But...I dunno, it ain't Kansas.

    check out these 7 locales...some of whicha have already been discussed. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe...755296/?page=1
    Last edited by dubmac; 2017-04-08 at 02:05 PM.

  8. #27
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    IMHO, an important thing is not to stay in small village, as OP will need car simply to buy groceries or to get to airport or hospital ... in bigger cities he can use public transportation...and if he need he can always rent a car
    I was suggesting NB/NS big cities because as per numbeo.com:
    Rent Prices in Moncton are 27.66% lower than in Peterborough
    Rent Prices in Fredericton are 25.05% lower than in Peterborough
    Rent Prices in Saint John are 26.53% lower than in Peterborough

  9. #28
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    Yeah, the suggestions for places like Peterborough or Vancouver Island are way over the top in terms of 'cheap'. You have to be losing population to have really cheap rent. Not even Powell River is dirt cheap. IIRC, I think the OP was thinking really cheap, e.g. $400 or so

  10. #29
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    OP is 62, when he turns 65 , he can get pretty fast subsidized housing (except some top locations like GTA or Vancouver) and will be paying 30% from income, but to apply , he needs at least to have notice of assessment

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by AltaRed View Post
    Yeah, the suggestions for places like Peterborough or Vancouver Island are way over the top in terms of 'cheap'. You have to be losing population to have really cheap rent. Not even Powell River is dirt cheap. IIRC, I think the OP was thinking really cheap, e.g. $400 or so
    Maybe Ocean Falls?


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