Weighing the pros and cons of how deep to have roots in Canada at 65+
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Thread: Weighing the pros and cons of how deep to have roots in Canada at 65+

  1. #1
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    Weighing the pros and cons of how deep to have roots in Canada at 65+

    Except for emergency healthcare, English spoken (more or less!), public libraries /recreation centres, and decent weather in a few places for 3-4 months a year I really see no great advantages to be retired in Canada - not financially, not emotionally and in very few other practical considerations either. I am a bachelor. I don't own a business or property. I slowly moved all my possessions to a storeroom in Asia so that at 62 I now live out of a suitcase in one of the most expensive metropolitan areas of Canada (GVRD) - for reasons of family obligation that are unlikely to last more than 5 years....

    I am a Canadian citizen and resident very well-travelled in Southeast and South Asia. I got most of my medical care overseas because I could see a specialist within a few days in Saigon, Penang or Mumbai who spends 30-40 minutes in a consult instead of 15. I could afford to eat out. And there is the history, the beaches, and more.

    In fact I am chomping at the bit to get old fast, so I can take my CPP, OAS and possibly GIC and get the heck out of here! The only thing that holds me back is virtually no savings. My retirement income will be meagre - dependent on the tax-payers in fact. On $700 I could live in Nepal or Cambodia but not Thailand or Taiwan. To live in any of the rapidly developing Asian Tigers it'll take GIC and probably part-time work or running a small business either overseas or here half the year for cash. Actually I could even report it. As I recall it isn't taken off dollar for dollar.

    My plan is to just rent a room in a shared apartment here in Canada (as indeed I do now) for the absolute minimal 'footprint' in Canada and for only one reason: continuing to qualify for GIC. And getting treated if I develop something disastrous like cancer.

    Snowbirds, who actually do this - I am most keen to learn from you. I sit at your feet for wisdom. Do any of you regret doing this?


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    Senior Member indexxx's Avatar
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    Friend of mine built a house in a village area of Thailand for $35K and is retired there living on his CPP etc. Lots of expats where he is. Had a bit of money from a condo sale in Richmond a few years ago- maybe $160K but that's it. He's lived in Thailand for years, only coming back to Canada to work for half the year to top up his CPP- loves it there and lives cheap. I'd like to do the same thing in some out of the way corner of the Med or the Caribbean. Might only make Penticton though... but hot and quiet is good enough for me.
    Last edited by indexxx; 2017-04-07 at 06:28 AM.
    "What good is money if you can't inspire terror in your fellow man?"- C.M. Burns

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    Senior Member sags's Avatar
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    I have thought about it. We have about $60,000 of our income that is guaranteed every year and could live quite well somewhere else.

    The problem is family. We don't have the heart to leave our son and grandson back in Canada.

    Now if they could come with us........but it wouldn't be to Asia. Too many terrorist groups and unstable governments.

    Maybe the countryside of Italy or Greece, but I think the cost of living is higher there than in Canada.

    I have always thought I would really enjoy living in Las Vegas and spending my time playing slot tournaments.

    Lots of casinos means lots of free drinks, cheap good food and always something to see and do.
    Last edited by sags; 2017-04-07 at 10:39 AM.
    Someone planted a tree a long time ago so I can sit in the shade.

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    You have to be a factual resident of Canada to qualify for GIS. Health Care coverage generally requires residency for about 6 months or more in each year. If you lie about it you are committing fraud.

    You can collect CPP and OAS while living abroad. The amount of CPP you receive will depend on how much you paid into it during your working life, which seems to have been rather peripatetic. The amount of OAS you can receive will depend on the number of years you have resided in Canada between ages 18 and 65.
    Last edited by OhGreatGuru; 2017-04-07 at 12:54 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OhGreatGuru View Post
    If you lie about it you are committing fraud.
    And, by the tenor of the OP's posts, committing fraud with a good measure of pride in so doing!

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    Senior Member pwm's Avatar
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    The OP is a parasite who's scheming how to game the system, but at least he is being honest about it.

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    You can certainly emigrate elsewhere and collect your earned CPP and your OAS (unless OAS rules change). It doesn't sound like family provides any reason to stay.

    It's hard to believe someone could be 62, unmarried without children, and have nothing saved, but whatever.

    Not sure why you would take the risk and rental expense of trying to maintain a false presence here just for GIS. Like OAS, it is subject to change at the whim of the government and subject to heavy penalty if you are falsely collecting it.

    If you are truly asking others here how to scam the system to collect GIS, my advice is to forget GIS and just get the f^ck out of Canada.
    Oh, and if you do get some long term illness, don't come back, rely instead on your cheap foreign doctor and the generosity of citizens there. We wouldn't want you anyway.

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    Keeping an apt or address here may not work. The government can easily keep track of when you exited and entered the country. That information is shared between departments. It may also be shared with the province in the future, negating your health coverage.
    Fraud is a criminal offense. But I hear the jails in Canada are quite warm although lack of sunlight may be a problem.

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    Worth discussing in detail

    Quote Originally Posted by OhGreatGuru View Post
    You have to be a factual resident of Canada to qualify for GIS. Health Care coverage generally requires residency for about 6 months or more in each year. If you lie about it you are committing fraud.

    You can collect CPP and OAS while living abroad. The amount of CPP you receive will depend on how much you paid into it during your working life, which seems to have been rather peripatetic. The amount of OAS you can receive will depend on the number of years you have resided in Canada between ages 18 and 65.
    Factual 'resident' - this I must learn the meaning of. "How long is a piece of string" as my grandfather used to say, adding "everything relies on a definition of terms". I hear all kinds of definitions of resident. The only one that counts for me is what the Federal government accepts for OAS, CPP and possibly GIS. I expect I will lose a few years off my OAS. I just don't know how many and who has to prove what. Is the burden of proof on the government or me? This is no easy task trying to get records from various employers, places I rented, doctors etc. A lot of it is amounting to estimates and even guesswork.

    RE: OAS, the formula according to my reading is 1/40th, A.K.A. 0.025 per month for every year away. This works out to $15 less every month for every year one was in Canada for fewer than 183 days.

    So, young people reading this - beware! Do not leave Canada for more than 183 days! Keep your medical insurance even if you object to a monopoly insurance plan with no two-tier system like most countries of the world (Netherlands, Switzerland, Germany...). Keep a bank account in Canada even if you don't use cheques, get a driver's license even if you take the bus, do whatever you can to buy property (even if it is scrubland for a trailer).

    As a technically self-employed commission salesman in one province and operator of a seasonal service business in another I did not contribute to CPP much past age 25. So I would be surprised if my CPP is any more than $100 per month. I will reply on OAS, very likely GIS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pwm View Post
    The OP is a parasite who's scheming how to game the system, but at least he is being honest about it.
    I am essentially a nomad,a 'rootless cosmopolitan' Guilty as charged. If I have to settle down I hang out an address at my hammock. I live hand to mouth and wherever I can derive maximum benefit. I don't subscribe to the concept of citizen except that passports have been required for a couple of centuries at least. For me the government is a landlord. If I don't like the terms of tenancy, I move. The only difference between me and an international corporation taking advantage of the system of incorporation in tax shelters and varying laws and practices is I am honest about it. And I am very much a 'small fry'.

    Seized pirate to Alexander the Great: ' "What do you mean by seizing the whole earth; because I do it with a petty ship, I am called a robber, while you who does it with a great fleet are styled emperor"

    If we must turn this into an ethical debate: Who is hurt by no flag waving?


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