Weighing the pros and cons of how deep to have roots in Canada at 65+ - Page 3
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Thread: Weighing the pros and cons of how deep to have roots in Canada at 65+

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by HermesHermes View Post
    I am essentially a nomad,a 'rootless cosmopolitan' Guilty as charged. If I have to settle down I hang out an address at my hammock. I live hand to mouth and wherever I can derive maximum benefit. I don't subscribe to the concept of citizen except that passports have been required for a couple of centuries at least. For me the government is a landlord. If I don't like the terms of tenancy, I move. The only difference between me and an international corporation taking advantage of the system of incorporation in tax shelters and varying laws and practices is I am honest about it. And I am very much a 'small fry'.

    Seized pirate to Alexander the Great: ' "What do you mean by seizing the whole earth; because I do it with a petty ship, I am called a robber, while you who does it with a great fleet are styled emperor"

    If we must turn this into an ethical debate: Who is hurt by no flag waving?
    Flag waving isn't the issue. "Rootless cosmopolitan" you are not, it means something entirely different from a different era.

    You are not at all like a corporation which produces something, provides employment and then uses legal means to minimize taxation.

    Parasite is the most accurate description, with a propensity for theft. Because taking taxpayer's money through fraud is theft. Canadian taxpayer is the victim, he is the one "hurt". Then again, the welfare system is designed to be played and the taxpayers keep voting for it... That's the root of the problem. That, and the fact people who don't pay taxes are allowed a vote.

    Last edited by mordko; 2017-04-08 at 06:05 AM.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by gibor365 View Post
    I also wouldn't go to Asia, just don't like Asian culture, food.mentality....
    I'd like to retire in Southern Spain .
    and sag, imho, you are mistaken about cost of living in Europe.... Living in Canada is very overvalued... check numbeo.com (you can compare 2 cities by hundreds of parameters ).



    For example very nice North Italian town of Brescia comparing with (not the most expensive London, ON - I think you live there)




    Or my favorite place Malaga


    In Andalusia , for long term, for 200-250 EUR you can rent not only apartment, but also townhouse.... Can you compare it with our prices? If you fully retired, rent you house and go for 3-4 months
    Southern Spain was the destination of choice for British retirees. Sun, cheap housing, cheap life, free healthcare. Millions of British expats.

    You should peruse British expats' forums. Yes, they bitch about Canada too, but Spain... Different level of bitching. Apparently, Spain is really cold. Or so the Brits say. In winter. Because houses aren't designed to be heated properly and temperatures do go down. And the pound collapsed, so local life all of a sudden got expensive. The houses they bought in Spain are now unsellable and have been for a while. Crime is a huge problem, not surprising with most of the local youth being on the dole and large immigration from North Africa. And now they might be losing the free Spanish healthcare...

    Italy - don't know. There are some expats, but not many. I found the prevalence of Swastikas in small towns near Rome a little off putting.

    As a general rule, tourism and immigration = two big differences, as they say in Odessa.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by HermesHermes View Post
    I am essentially a nomad,a 'rootless cosmopolitan' Guilty as charged. If I have to settle down I hang out an address at my hammock. I live hand to mouth and wherever I can derive maximum benefit. I don't subscribe to the concept of citizen except that passports have been required for a couple of centuries at least. For me the government is a landlord. If I don't like the terms of tenancy, I move. The only difference between me and an international corporation taking advantage of the system of incorporation in tax shelters and varying laws and practices is I am honest about it. And I am very much a 'small fry'.
    In other words, you are more than willing to take advantage of your Canadian citizenship when it's convenient and provides for you because others do all the hard work to provide you with benefits.

    You're just another mooch who tries to hide it by spouting "I don't believe in citizenship BS" that fails every logic test. If you honestly and truly don't believe in citizenship, then put your money where your mouth is and prove it...renounce your citizenship, pack up your stuff, and leave for a place with no government where the realities of your fantasy will become apparent soon enough.

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by HermesHermes View Post
    ...

    1. Upon whom is the onus to prove the 40 years of residency for OAS? The applicant or the government?

    2. If the person applying for GIS must prove residency how is it done - rent receipts, bank accounts, car insurance, ATM withdrawals, hospital admissions, WHAT?

    .
    From Application Form for OAS:
    14. Residence history

    List below all of the places you have lived from age 18 to present both inside and outside of Canada. Do not include periods when you were outside Canada for less than six months at a time.

    (Note: You must provide proof of your residence history. See the information sheet under "Documents Required". If you need more space, use a separate sheet of paper.)

    From Information Sheet to Application Form:

    Proof of Residence History (Refer to question 14 on the application)

    If you have not lived in Canada all your life, you must send us certified photocopies of documents that prove your history of residence in Canada. You can use the following documents to prove when you entered, departed or returned to Canada:

    - passports;
    - immigration records (such as visas);
    - customs declarations; or
    - other approved documents that can prove your history of residence in Canada.

    Your past efforts to stay under the government's radar all these years are now going to come back and bite you in the a**
    Last edited by OhGreatGuru; 2017-04-09 at 02:12 PM.

  6. #25
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    You should peruse British expats' forums. Yes, they bitch about Canada too, but Spain... Different level of bitching. Apparently, Spain is really cold. Or so the Brits say. In winter. Because houses aren't designed to be heated properly and temperatures do go down.
    Cannot tell about all Spain, I was researching specifically Malaga area. January average temp 13, high 17, low 7 (exactly like in Tel Aviv, not a problem at all ))

    And the pound collapsed, so local life all of a sudden got expensive..The houses they bought in Spain are now unsellable and have been for a while.
    Very good . I like it! I've seen Brits who both condos in Malaga, renting them now dirt cheap, but they want 1 year rent paid up front. Also with upcoming Brexit, everything will be even cheaper.

    Crime is a huge problem, not surprising with most of the local youth being on the dole and large immigration from North Africa. And now they might be losing the free Spanish healthcare..
    Be surprised, but crime in Malaga much less then in Toronto
    Toronto Crime Index: 35.07 , Malaga 28.05
    Toronto Safety Scale: 64.93 , Malaga 71.95
    https://www.numbeo.com/crime/compare...o&city2=Malaga

    Comparing with Beer Sheva where I worked in police (Crime Index: 40.94, Safety Scale: 59.06), crime in Malaga practically non-exist.

    As a general rule, tourism and immigration = two big differences, as they say in Odessa.
    Believe me , I know it very well . Just to emphasize , I am NOT talking about immigration, but about long-term 3-5 months vacations.... as oppose to OP preference to Asian countries. Pay me, i won't go to India
    Last edited by gibor365; 2017-04-09 at 01:25 AM.

  7. #26
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    Mordko is clearly wrong with his rhetoric. The op is precisely like a corporation that does not pay taxes but recurves Canadian benefits. The only way it is different is that mordko thinks it is ok when he does it.

    I like this thread. It is possible to live on next to nothing and have a good life. Who are we to impose our life values on the op?

    We have been focused on retiring to Vancouver for the last 20 years and have been mindlessly building wealth to accomplish that. We think of retirement numbers that are very large.

    I've seen the YouTube videos that show how to live in Cambodia for $350 per month. Those folks have everything they need. We look at numbers 20x that and I've come to realize that 19x of that multiple goes to government overhead and consumerism; mostly the former.

    To the op: consider the idea of going to Mexico. If you can get your passive income up to $1500/mo, you could have a good life in a number of beautiful places and have good healthcare. Put in a couple of years of hard work, build up some momentum, go to Mexico, and never look back.

    Canada does not bring that much value anymore.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomB19 View Post
    We have been focused on retiring to Vancouver for the last 20 years and have been mindlessly building wealth to accomplish that. We think of retirement numbers that are very large.

    I've seen the YouTube videos that show how to live in Cambodia for $350 per month. Those folks have everything they need.
    TomB, I cannot help but ask, why would anyone save up to retire to Vancouver? As someone who lived and worked there for many years, my goal was to retire away from there. Vancouver is bearable if one has no choice, i.e., that's where one's employment or business is based. But your case is the first I have heard of someone wanting to migrate there in retirement. It's a great place if you fancy grey skies, copious rainfall, pollution, Bangkok-style traffic jams, high crime and overpriced everything.

    As for Cambodia, I am sure one can live there for $350/mo. if one chooses to "go native". Do you think you could be content? When you say they have everything they need, do they really? Will that $350/mo. budget cover, for eg., heart surgery or extensive cancer treatment should such be required?

    My experience with living in places like Cambodia is that the ordinary people simply do not expect to have money for such things as treatment for major illness in hospital. They do not have it and they do not expect government or anyone else to pay. They accept their fate, which is to recover without treatment or die. Usually it's the latter. Leaving major illness aside, many do not have money even for basic medicine when needed. I do not really know much about Cambodia, but I know places like it and I am sure I am not far off the mark in saying that $350/mo. provides little beyond subsistence.

    Someone who lived close by when I lived in California retired to the Philippines. He said he could not afford to retire in a major SoCal city. The RP is one of those S.E. Asian countries featured, inter alia, in YouTube videos touting "Live like a king in the Phils for $500 a month". The PI is also one of those countries known for medical tourism. Treatment can be had there for a fraction of the cost of treatment in the west. My CA acquaintance recently encountered heart problems requiring several surgeries. The total bill came to close to USD25,000. In the U.S. it probably would have been $250,000. But the fact is that for him, it was still a lot of money and he was reduced to begging on the internet for donations to save his life. I suspect that the outcome in Cambodia would not be much different.

    I'll add, TomB, that I think your Mexico comment is a good one. From what I have seen on travels there, if you avoid the trendy spots and don't have to be on the beach, you can do fairly well on $1,500/mo.
    Last edited by Mukhang pera; 2017-04-09 at 06:56 PM.

  9. #28
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    I live in Regina. I used to go to Vancouver regularly with a former employer. My wife joined me, several times. We loved it.

    Vancouver is beautiful and culturally rich. We love it but we have now refocused our interest in other places that happen to be more affordable. Kelowna being one of them.

    I adore British Columbia.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomB19 View Post
    I live in Regina. I used to go to Vancouver regularly with a former employer. My wife joined me, several times. We loved it.

    Vancouver is beautiful and culturally rich. We love it but we have now refocused our interest in other places that happen to be more affordable. Kelowna being one of them.

    I adore British Columbia.
    TomB,

    I think Kelowna area makes more sense for retirement. When my wife and I moved from Vancouver to our rather remote Vancouver Island location, we thought we would enjoy going back to Vancouver from time to time just for a dose of culture and civilization. For awhile, we made regular trips, but we came to enjoy them less and less. It got so that the best part of the trip was getting out of Vancouver.

    Even leaving out Kelowna, the Okanagan has a number of places worth checking out for retirement. Then, if you feel the urge, you can still get to Vancouver once in awhile.

  11. #30
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    I appreciate your take on Vancouver. Thanks.

    By the way, I have a cousin who lives in South Western Spain in winter and she has convinced me to consider it as a retirement destination. She pointed out a few of the problems but the upsides are really strong.

    It would be amazing to live close to the beach on the Mediterranean with car access to all of Europe.

    The major downside she pointed to is the strength of the euro but she said the col is generally about half of what it costs them in Nova Scotia.


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