Snowbirds: Who checks how many months in Canada in order to qualify for GIC? - Page 2
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Thread: Snowbirds: Who checks how many months in Canada in order to qualify for GIC?

  1. #11
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    I suspect that this is just one of the reasons why a passport is required. Common document, common format for all countries that has the universal IT swipe and access. Seems to me that keeping track is very simple. The question would be if the Gov't department wants to access it.

    We have seen a huge increase in security measures in many countries. Last winter when we entered Panama our pictures and our fingerprints (both hands) were taken electronically. When we left Panama our fingerprints were taken again and I assumed compared to the entry set for verification. Each time we have entered Thailand over the past four years our picture and fingerprints have been taken and stored. As I passed the booth and looked back I could see my spouses details come up on the immigration officers screen. Picture, fingerprints and a list that appeared from a distance like various dates of entry from the electronic record of her passport. I think digital fingerprints and photo comparison are far better than a simple passport verification. Prior to the electronic check passports were a bit of a joke. Easily forged, easy to get blanks. There have been many reports that the Israeli Mossad traveled on fake Canadian passports for years. As have others.


  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by james4beach View Post
    Through the DHS I-94 portal. These records are visible to me because of my particular US customs & immigration status.
    It won't be visible to casual US visitors, but I bet the same information is tracked for everyone.
    I am not sure a special status is required to do the checking. Mine expired well over sixteen years ago where my info is showing up.
    http://blog.tugo.com/en/blog/databas...story-for-you/
    https://i94.cbp.dhs.gov/I94/#/history-search


    Cheers

  3. #13
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    Per Ian above, passports are getting very difficult to fake. Even banana repulbics have the wherewithall to manufacture (use) Internationally consistent passports with all the security features....and the equipment to read them. Whether countries choose to use that information and technology is a different question. I've watched a few episodes of Border Security that take place in Columbia's Bogota El Dorado airport and they have (and use) sophisticated passport readers to check (their) databases. What is not yet a closed loop (I think) is how diverse and shared are the databases. I doubt Canada and the USA share their databases with the good folks in Columbia, for example.

    FWIW, I am supportive of some processes that measure the coming and going of individuals between borders. It will potentially catch nefarious types up to no good... AND speaking more to my pocketbook, catching scumbags that suck off the Canadian taxpayer teat. In some ways, I think it has been a pretty leaky sieve up to now and it is time to nail those who take advantage of our social programs illegally.

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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ian View Post
    I suspect that this is just one of the reasons why a passport is required. Common document, common format for all countries that has the universal IT swipe and access. Seems to me that keeping track is very simple. The question would be if the Gov't department wants to access it.
    Not sure why they need to access the American database as they are supposed to be sharing the info, regardless of what's available on the web.


    For the moment, the border tracking system – promised in 2011 as part of the perimeter security pact – involves exchanging entry information collected from people at the land border, so that data on entry to one country serves as a record of exit from the other.

    The first two phases of the program have been limited to foreign nationals and permanent residents of Canada and the United States, but not citizens of either country.

    The initiative was to be expanded by June 30, 2014, to include information-sharing on all travellers crossing the land border.

    In addition, Canada had planned to begin collecting information on people leaving by plane – something the United States already does – by requiring airlines to submit passenger manifest data for outbound international flights.
    http://globalnews.ca/news/2569859/ca...security-data/

    http://www.news1130.com/2015/01/19/n...ength-of-trip/


    Cheers

  6. #15
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    And how about all those freeloading Americans who come north of the border to use provincial health to get free medical care? This definitely happens. I wonder how much of a drain on Ontario's finances this causes.

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by james4beach View Post
    And how about all those freeloading Americans who come north of the border to use provincial health to get free medical care? This definitely happens. I wonder how much of a drain on Ontario's finances this causes.
    How do you know this happens? Without a provincial health insurance card, why wouldn't they have to pay out of pocket?

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AltaRed View Post
    How do you know this happens? Without a provincial health insurance card, why wouldn't they have to pay out of pocket?
    Yes, but they bill after the fact, not before.

    As a former hospital auditor, checking Accounts & Receivables from foreign clients... well you guess how often they pay.

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic12 View Post
    I am not sure a special status is required to do the checking. Mine expired well over sixteen years ago where my info is showing up.
    http://blog.tugo.com/en/blog/databas...story-for-you/
    https://i94.cbp.dhs.gov/I94/#/history-search


    Cheers
    I just clicked on both links and access was denied. I then googled and found the relevant page, I think, on the US gov't website, but it stated that the info had since been archived due to a change in administration or something to that effect. Were you actually able to see your info at time of posting, Eclectic12?

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by AltaRed View Post
    How do you know this happens? Without a provincial health insurance card, why wouldn't they have to pay out of pocket?
    I heard that it used to be an issue, but I don't know if it still is today. Either fraudulent use of cards, or just getting the services and then not producing a valid card.

    From this 1993 NYTimes article,
    "It's not an epidemic in any one person's practice," said Keith MacLeod, an obstetrician in Windsor, Ontario, across from Detroit, "but I would estimate that from 12 to 20 of my patients at any one time are ineligible Americans. And I'm just one of 520 doctors in Windsor, 23,000 in Ontario."
    . . .
    Loopholes and the lack of stringent controls are costing the provincial health care system as much as $691 million a year, the Ontario report found.
    This 2007 article is by an immigration lawyer:

    Americans living near the border can rent or buy health cards. Some permanent residents and citizens rent or lend their cards to friends or family who visit them from abroad. I am an immigration lawyer, and some of my clients have confirmed that this practice is rampant. (Editor’s Note: Former B.C. MLA David Schreck has recently pointed out B.C. irregularities similar to those in Ontario.)
    Last edited by james4beach; 2017-05-05 at 02:19 AM.

  11. #20
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    It used to be an issue. I wonder if it still is today. I've heard stories of Americans going to Canadian clinics and talking their way through it, saying they just misplaced their health card
    Yeah, yeah... go try it , I bet you will be turned away ...
    btw, I've read that some Americans esp. from Florida were going to Cuba to get free health care.... one of the reasons why severals yearsago Cubans chaged the rules entering the country


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