Furnish living room of Rental Property? - Page 3
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Thread: Furnish living room of Rental Property?

  1. #21
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    A dishwaser is definitely going to be a plus for renters .I wouldn't overthink the furnishing stuff though.


  2. #22
    Senior Member carverman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mossman1 View Post
    Agreed. Thanks for pointing that out as one of many things to consider. I haven't closed on the house yet, so still lots of time.

    I'll ask the insurance company as well or do some research on that regarding liability, coverage, etc.,
    As JAG and others have pointed out, renting out a house, never mind a furnished house to tenants unknown can be a big risk and responsibility if some happens such as a fire etc.

    I would agree with JAG that supplying a bbq and propane tank is definitely not a good idea, not from just the issue of storing the propane tank (which do leak) but MISUSE resulting in burns, eyebrow singe-ing and other things such as smoke coming into the premises. Lets assume here that the tenant has a couple small kids that decided to "play" with the bbq and'are
    badly burned as a result. MAJOR LAWSUIT!

    Same with upholstered furniture, (beds and sofas) due to the bed bug infestation common in many citiies.

    If there was an infestation, not only are you responsible for disposing of the affected furniture but you would have to call in pest control to fumigate the premises. Same with roaches.

    As far as appliances (other than stove and fridge, that's about all you would need to supply and even there, you would be responsible to repair, if necessary.

    Lastly, since you need to report the rental to a insurance company for your protection as a LANDLORD, lots of questions will be raised by the insurance company, before they issue a liability and fire insurance policy to you on the premises.

    The tenants will have to have their own SEPARATE tenant contents insurance.

    Your premiums will be based on your history as well as wether the tenants are smokers. That's a bit hard to say upfront,and this is something that has to be determined when the LEASE is signed.

    A clause has to be provided in the lease to be checked by the tenant whether ANYONE in the rental unit is a smoker, as most insurance companies will assume they are, and the insurance policy premiums could be higher as the insurance
    company has to assume the risk if your place burns down due to careless smokers or kitchen fires due to unattended
    pots catching fire on the stove.

    After all, you are not the homeowner living in these premises.
    Also things like smoke detectors and Carbon Monoxide detectors (if heated by fossilm fuels (nat gas or oil) will be necessary and proper egress available, in case of fire.
    Last edited by carverman; 2017-03-08 at 07:31 AM.

  3. #23
    Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by carverman View Post
    As JAG and others have pointed out, renting out a house, never mind a furnished house to tenants unknown can be a big risk and responsibility if some happens such as a fire etc.

    I would agree with JAG that supplying a bbq and propane tank is definitely not a good idea, not from just the issue of storing the propane tank (which do leak) but MISUSE resulting in burns, eyebrow singe-ing and other things such as smoke coming into the premises. Lets assume here that the tenant has a couple small kids that decided to "play" with the bbq and'are
    badly burned as a result. MAJOR LAWSUIT!

    Same with upholstered furniture, (beds and sofas) due to the bed bug infestation common in many citiies.

    If there was an infestation, not only are you responsible for disposing of the affected furniture but you would have to call in pest control to fumigate the premises. Same with roaches.

    As far as appliances (other than stove and fridge, that's about all you would need to supply and even there, you would be responsible to repair, if necessary.

    Lastly, since you need to report the rental to a insurance company for your protection as a LANDLORD, lots of questions will be raised by the insurance company, before they issue a liability and fire insurance policy to you on the premises.

    The tenants will have to have their own SEPARATE tenant contents insurance.

    Your premiums will be based on your history as well as wether the tenants are smokers. That's a bit hard to say upfront,and this is something that has to be determined when the LEASE is signed.

    A clause has to be provided in the lease to be checked by the tenant whether ANYONE in the rental unit is a smoker, as most insurance companies will assume they are, and the insurance policy premiums could be higher as the insurance
    company has to assume the risk if your place burns down due to careless smokers or kitchen fires due to unattended
    pots catching fire on the stove.

    After all, you are not the homeowner living in these premises.
    Also things like smoke detectors and Carbon Monoxide detectors (if heated by fossilm fuels (nat gas or oil) will be necessary and proper egress available, in case of fire.
    Much appreciated in framing it from that perspective as well as the other very helpful information. Definitely true that this isn't a 'game' and all pre-cautions in being proactive and defensive must be taken. As well as making sure the place is clean, painted, basic functioning appliances, meets safety standards, good screening are the requirements for success in the long-run.


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