Furnish living room of Rental Property? - Page 2
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Thread: Furnish living room of Rental Property?

  1. #11
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    Since it's detached I would definitely not furnish it. Anyone looking for detached will have their own furniture (and will be annoyed if a place is furnished).


  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spudd View Post
    Since it's detached I would definitely not furnish it. Anyone looking for detached will have their own furniture (and will be annoyed if a place is furnished).
    That seems to be the consensus. I'll just make sure to freshly paint it a soft white, get new, fresh feeling window treatments, and take good pictures with good lighting. Might hire the company that listed for the neighbour's as they use a wide angle lens and good flash. The main thing I'll be looking to put in is the patio chairs for the back deck. BBQ will be a later decision based on additional information regarding liability, and if so, make sure it's in a safe, contained space away from the house.

  3. #13
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    In my experience, renters have no respect for the property (high end) let alone any furnishings. You will be throwing money away and then will have the problems of disposing of it when the renter moves out.

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  5. #14
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    I used to do blinds and window coverings...they always got trashed and needed replacing. Now I just do curtain rods so that they don't try to put up their own and do more damage.
    I'm not JustAGuy (without spaces), or Donald, or <insert name here>.

  6. #15
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    I wouldn't want any furniture in a home I'm renting. For hygienic and taste purposes.

  7. #16
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    When I was a student, my landlord had a furnished house which was a big plus as it meant keeping more money in my pocket and was very much appreciated. We had couches, dining set and even spare pots and pans. We were good tenants. Unfortunately, the tenants downstairs didn't respect it at all and destroyed the furniture which upset my landlord.

    If I was to look for a new place, I wouldn't consider a furnished apartment at all given the bedbugs issue and hygiene associated with couches. However, dining table and chairs (wooden, not upholstered) seem to be appreciated by a lot of folks so you can consider that. Blinds and window coverings are always appreciated and I've never seen an apartment for rent without them. Just get the cheaper ones (from wal-mart or something) so that you won't be too far in the hole if you have to replace them!

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorthKC View Post
    When I was a student, my landlord had a furnished house which was a big plus as it meant keeping more money in my pocket and was very much appreciated. We had couches, dining set and even spare pots and pans. We were good tenants. Unfortunately, the tenants downstairs didn't respect it at all and destroyed the furniture which upset my landlord.

    If I was to look for a new place, I wouldn't consider a furnished apartment at all given the bedbugs issue and hygiene associated with couches. However, dining table and chairs (wooden, not upholstered) seem to be appreciated by a lot of folks so you can consider that. Blinds and window coverings are always appreciated and I've never seen an apartment for rent without them. Just get the cheaper ones (from wal-mart or something) so that you won't be too far in the hole if you have to replace them!
    Thanks for the insight on that. Yea, will keep it simple. Might put in the option of a simple kitchen table again, because the space of the layout is a bit tight so an appropriate sized table might be an option.

  9. #18
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    Is it going to give you any benefits? Are you going to get more rent? Are you going to get tenants faster than your competitors? If not, why are you so determined to do it?

    It may turn off tenants who have their own furniture. They will probably treat it poorly. You aren't really attracted by the tenants who may be interested in partially furnished apartment, yet you seem determined to do it.

    I don't understand your thinking. Do you just want to subconsciously control your tenants life?
    I'm not JustAGuy (without spaces), or Donald, or <insert name here>.

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just a Guy View Post
    Is it going to give you any benefits? Are you going to get more rent? Are you going to get tenants faster than your competitors? If not, why are you so determined to do it?

    It may turn off tenants who have their own furniture. They will probably treat it poorly. You aren't really attracted by the tenants who may be interested in partially furnished apartment, yet you seem determined to do it.

    I don't understand your thinking. Do you just want to subconsciously control your tenants life?
    The hopeful benefit is a 'happier' tenant who will get attracted to a more comfortable place. Provide comfort in the back deck as a big selling point to justify a higher rent. Again, the kitchen table is because it's a smaller space, but that may be more of an option if I develop a good rapport with the potential tenant. I'm not counting pennies here in maximizing profits.

    We currently have a long-term tenant in the basement. We also used to rent out our house which , and guess what, it had a bbq and the tenants loved using it! (go figure). Now it wasn't marketed with it, but it just so happened we were living here, moved out for a few years, and it was just there which we said to go ahead and use it. Whenever I came over to fix something, or look at an issue, it definitely helped being pretty friendly with the tenants.

    The house also doesn't have a dishwasher. Should I also not install one as a benefit in hopes of securing a good tenant? Especially since Tenants treat everything like crap? Is updating curtains so bad? It already has rods and existing ones that are a bit gawdy.

    But since this is my first out of the gate rental in hopes of attracting a professional, long-term tenant, with specific defined rules, my thinking from a marketing and benefit perspective is what's driving my questions. Much like how a person would buy a condo that has some desirable amenities in hopes of attracting a higher paying tenant. Institution owned apartment rentals also consider 'luxury' amenities in the type of rent premium they would charge.

    Now you might be a more experienced landlord, and have come to learn to be a tough, don't give an inch landlord. If so, I'd be interested in hearing a confirmation on that. I'm still a naive, starry-eyed one, hopeful to have a good relationship with the tenant (assuming I can filter out a good one), wishful thinking of the positive side of things.

    In terms of control, you're right. Maybe there is a form of control. Rookie mistake type thing. But a negative covenant such as credit check, employment record is a form of trying to control the person. Why not a positive covenant such as a benefit of 2 patio chairs in the deck with no controlling conditions attached? Other than I'll come before winter to tie it up, much like how a condo building maintenance person will do it.

    Again, I appreciate your viewpoint as you are speaking from experience.

  11. #20
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    I've had plenty of long term tenants over the years. Some places I've bought have left things behind like a picnic table. Sometimes a tenant leaves things behind as well, like a microwave or something. If they moved out and the stuff was no longer good, I threw it out and didn't replace.

    Personally, I haven't noticed that the next tenant stays any longer, or acts any better because of the stuff.

    I have noticed a difference in people who are screened, and other landlords who don't bother to screen properly.

    This isn't to say I haven't had bad tenants, but people also don't move because the landlord over there provides a BBQ. Good screening and a good relationship probably gets you better tenants.

    I'm not JustAGuy (without spaces), or Donald, or <insert name here>.

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