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Thread: Career fork in the road

  1. #11
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    Always choose lifestyle.

    I recently took one-step back in pay to take 2 steps forward in a year. That being said I am now leaps forward in lifestyle. I took a huge pay cut and moved on to a new job that allows for a schedule, stable pay cheque (granted it is less...But there is something to be said about stability after a decade of not knowing how much you will make at the end of the year), benefits, the actual work load is less stressful, safer, and I still enjoy what I do.

    Most importantly I spend more time at home and I'm able to enjoy many things I missed out on in the past. To those that say work 6 days a week to be successful ... What an absurd statement. Go to a hospice and start interviewing patients about regrets in life. I'd bet my last dollar that you would not find many that wished they worked 6 day and 60 hour work weeks. I put work first for the first decade of my career. I must be a slow learner because it took 12 years of saying no to friends and family and foolishly saying yes to work to now realize that is an awful life to lead.

    I worked 10 days last month and I look forward to only working 8 this month. Work smarter, not harder. I consider myself successful even though I work substantially less than 6 days a week and much less then 60 hour work weeks.


  2. #12
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    ^ You make very good points AgDriver, no doubt. But I tell you, I have met lots of older people who in their later years realized that time was running out, the train has departed. Now they're stuck and have to work longer, or have to compromise lifestyle a fair bit in retirement. I'm not talking about people who have spent way beyond their means, and the music has finally stopped. I'm talking about people with the intellect and muscle firepower to be much more, but just laid back, took it easy, did the bare minimum, never upgraded their skills, and never pushed themselves. In their late working years, they become just 1 lay off from becoming essentially unemployable. They get a big shock finding out they're not competitive for jobs anymore, and they find themselves seriously lagging behind others who put a little bit more effort in. Those people have major regrets that I don't want.

    Now add to that some have always had bad money management skills, and it becomes a pretty ugly picture very quickly after a layoff. For me, I have always said I'd rather do the heavy lifting early and the coasting late. One major step I'd like to take, is the transition from trading my time for money (on hourly or salary basis). Meaning, I really want to learn and build on passive income, be it in stock or real estate.


    Now back to the topic at hand, and this fork in my road. I thought of a very interesting question last night. If I were to win the lottery, which job would I still continue to do. That has firmed up my answer a fair bit already.

  3. #13
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    If you're young, take the job and the experience that comes with it. You can always step back down fairly easily - externally or internally. When you get tapped on the shoulder, you need to take it. It's a good vote of confidence, and if you keep doing well at the new job, you're pretty much writing your ticket for the future. This is all based on the assumption that you're going into junior or middle management.

    I'm 39 and have a director-level job. At this point in my life, like others have mentioned, I'm willing to sacrifice money for lifestyle to a certain point. I don't really care to make VP in the future, especially if it comes at the cost of lifestyle. However, when I was younger, I definitely strived to get a manager-level job so that I could increase earnings and get the experience I needed to continue to move up.

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  5. #14
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    I think the ultimate goal should be to retire around 50-55.
    For millennials that should give 30 years of good health to enjoy retirement.
    Most won't get there by hanging on the golf course.
    jmo

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by STech View Post
    ... You make very good points AgDriver, no doubt.
    Part of the challenge is that everyone is different and values different things.

    I can still recall the co-worker who was upset that because the job that was applied for was in HR's view, not challenging enough with no consideration of what the employee's goal was, HR wouldn't pass on the resume. Being concerned to make sure it is a fit is okay but because they couldn't understand the employee's values ... the company lost the employee.


    Quote Originally Posted by STech View Post
    ... But I tell you, I have met lots of older people who in their later years realized that time was running out, the train has departed. Now they're stuck and have to work longer, or have to compromise lifestyle a fair bit in retirement. I'm not talking about people who have spent way beyond their means, and the music has finally stopped.
    Not that it matters but I seem to be running into the opposite ... most who have lamented not taking the promotion, after talking long enough were seeing the upgrade in $$$ a solution for their spending & money management issues. They didn't seem to have noticed that those with much higher pay grades with similar issues were making similar complaints. The root of the problem was not tied to how many $$$ were being received.


    Quote Originally Posted by STech View Post
    ... In their late working years, they become just 1 lay off from becoming essentially unemployable. They get a big shock finding out they're not competitive for jobs anymore, and they find themselves seriously lagging behind others who put a little bit more effort in. Those people have major regrets that I don't want.
    Question is ... is more of an "administrative" role an improvement on the employability scale?

    If you are confident you can move back down, should you decide you hate it ... I'd tend to lean to giving it a try, but that's me.


    Cheers

  7. #16
    Senior Member tygrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic12 View Post
    I'd tend to lean to giving it a try, but that's me.
    I tend to lean to not doing it and instead planning for an early exit by building another venture. Just cause you like the place now, doesnt mean you will in 20 yrs and being a manager wont help you retire sooner. You will give that all back in taxes.

    Never ever rely on one source of income.

  8. #17
    Senior Member olivaw's Avatar
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    I'd be concerned that the salary, job security and potential job satisfaction are lower than the current position.
    Last edited by olivaw; 2017-03-02 at 01:04 PM.
    If you have something to say - then say.

  9. #18
    Senior Member Beaver101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tygrus View Post
    I tend to lean to not doing it and instead planning for an early exit by building another venture. Just cause you like the place now, doesnt mean you will in 20 yrs and being a manager wont help you retire sooner. You will give that all back in taxes.

    Never ever rely on one source of income.
    ... now, that's thinking outside of the box and keeping up with the time.
    Everyone should be respected as an individual, but no one idolized.-A. Einstein

  10. #19
    Senior Member tygrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beaver101 View Post
    ... now, that's thinking outside of the box and keeping up with the time.

    Mid management level skills are not going to be needed in the future. Big data and AI will render most of those obsolete. More security cleaning septic tanks.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/...ticle34185354/
    Last edited by tygrus; 2017-03-02 at 02:53 PM.

  11. #20
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    I have a friend who I went to college with; we had very similar paths, until he took a position as a manager 6 years ago. At first I was jealous, then I started to see that in order for him to succeed, he had to put in many extra hours of his time. I got to shutdown my computer at 4 and go on with my real life.

    He backed down as a manager, because of stress and also dealing with crappy employees. We had spent many hours on the phone talking about problems he had with his employees; and it caused him major health issues.

    He now makes the same salary as lower management (without bonus) and gets to spend more time with his friends and family. The end.

    Last edited by fstamand; 2017-03-07 at 09:42 PM.

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