What's a millennial to do in this housing market? - Page 3
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Thread: What's a millennial to do in this housing market?

  1. #21
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    For jobs, it depends on what you do. I would have a hard time working in my line of work anywhere else in Canada.


  2. #22
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    Curious as to what job only exists in one city in the entire world...or who would teach someone how to do a job that only exists in one city, can't imagine any school would offer a course, can't be that big of a market.

    I suppose, if you're the primier, the other provinces wouldn't elect you after seeing what you did, but then again there is Notley in Alberta, so you can never say never I suppose.
    Last edited by Just a Guy; 2017-02-15 at 12:08 AM.
    I'm not JustAGuy (without spaces), or Donald, or <insert name here>.

  3. #23
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    I said Canada. Most of the companies I could work for in Canada are based in the GTA. I could do something else and get a job elsewhere, but it would be a career change.

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  5. #24
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    Still curious as to what job is exclusive to gta...there are high finance jobs in other provinces, engineering, medicine, law, food trucks, manufacturing, import/export...

    You're not Rob Ford who faked his death are you?
    I'm not JustAGuy (without spaces), or Donald, or <insert name here>.

  6. #25
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    Think along the lines of a specialization that large companies need (some, at least) and would tend to have centralized at the head office. Not the CEO . Not especially well-paid or requiring advanced qualifications, though it can help. I could probably get a job in Montreal, but my french is middling at best. It would be a stretch, but I could work for government, such as DND. On the other hand, in the US, there are quite a number of cities I could work. I could probably live elsewhere in Canada if I consulted and did a lot of travelling, but I would probably spend more time in Toronto on business than living 'at home'.

    If I gave up on this particular specialization, I could work in a lot of other different management positions.

    I'm not trying to be overly coy, I just don't want to get too specific.

  7. #26
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    I agree with Just A Guy. I work in the downtown core, but I sure as hell won't move to Toronto. The prices are outrageous and I afford a much better life even with the commute into work. I still come out well ahead of some co workers living within walking distance paying outrageous prices for a shoe box stacked on shoe boxes.

    My advice..... Don't live in the GTA.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrewf View Post
    If you're spending more on the wedding than you expect in gifts (cash/in kind), I would suggest paring back. In 20 years you are not going to regret having a more modest wedding.

    True that, no one remembers your center pieces, decor, flowers, etc...

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just a Guy View Post
    Canada is a big place, lots of opportunities all across it...no one has to remain in Toronto. Contrary to some people's beliefs the rest of Canada has electricity, internet, computers, cars, jobs, places to eat, places to shop, places to work (even places that pay more)...
    I second this thought.

    In the nearest little town to me, Bancroft, one can get for $200,000 what would cost north of $1M in Toronto. A teacher might earn 5% less than TDSB teacher, that is pretty much the same. Said teacher in Bancroft could walk to at least 4 schools from anywhere in Bancroft, that is get by without 2 cars quite easily.

    In summary, a single teacher salary around here long term results in a likely better financial future than a dual teacher family in Toronto buying a >$1M house and owning 2 cars. The reality is that the teacher/teacher or teacher/police offices families up here with $200,000 annual income can live like absolute royalty. (I don't know how some of them still manage to live paycheck to paycheck, but they do.)

    For consideration ...

    hboy54

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrewf View Post
    Think along the lines of a specialization that large companies need (some, at least) and would tend to have centralized at the head office. Not the CEO . Not especially well-paid or requiring advanced qualifications, though it can help. I could probably get a job in Montreal, but my french is middling at best. It would be a stretch, but I could work for government, such as DND. On the other hand, in the US, there are quite a number of cities I could work. I could probably live elsewhere in Canada if I consulted and did a lot of travelling, but I would probably spend more time in Toronto on business than living 'at home'.

    If I gave up on this particular specialization, I could work in a lot of other different management positions.

    I'm not trying to be overly coy, I just don't want to get too specific.
    Hmm, we have lots of large head offices in Calgary so I'd be surprised if you couldn't find whatever specialized job here. Not that I would necessarily recommend moving here right now. I'm just not sold that Toronto has that many specific opportunities not offered elsewhere.

    Anyway, for myself I bought a house with my fiancee, rented out the basement to save for our wedding, but that was a different housing market. I wouldn't recommend that now. I agree with the majority to really think hard about how important an expensive wedding is. They get you for every little thing, and while a $30K wedding is fancier than a $10K wedding it won't actually affect anyone's enjoyment of the day or the success of the marriage. It's also really easy to overestimate what percentage of the people you want to invite to your wedding today you'll even be talking to in 5-10 years.

  11. #30
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    The earliest millennials would technically be 35 this year. Alot of them in the last 4 years beat their next generation to it. I know because I've been studying, observing for a long time.

    When Danforth East Semis were going for 550K 4 years ago, all I saw at open houses were hipsterish millennials. But they all just had a baby or were pregnant. My wife and I used to joke that they were probably condo renters from Liberty Village. What last bastion of affordability in Toronto West of Victoria Park was wiped out starting the spring of 2014 with the infamous Rhodes 3-brm semi going over 700K shattering a psychological barrier.

    I know one Millennial couple that bought a Scarbs bungalow just 1.5 years ago for about 600K. They definitely got help from their parents and or over leveraged. Now it's worth over 800K. Too many Millennials I found just wanted it too close to the city , along the subway, or new up in the real burbs where it's also exploded. They didn't even remotely consider the more affordable areas of the city. And even now, that's unaffordable (2 bedroom row townhouse at Kennedy Stn going for at least 450K with ~300$ in monthly maintenance cost). So the newer generation, there's still pockets in Ajax, semis, townhouses which are relatively cheaper.

    But really, the time to marry, live with Parents is becoming more real and real. Just like what has happened in other parts of the world.


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