Benefits or social assistance for my retiring father? - Page 2
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Thread: Benefits or social assistance for my retiring father?

  1. #11
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    Economics 101:

    Give more money to the poor ... and you will get more people that are poor. If that is the objective, knock yourself out.


  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sags View Post
    As a general question to the forum members.

    If a person in Canada, who never left Canada but struggled throughout their lives with addictions and other problems and didn't qualify for any CPP pension, reaches old age..........what benefits do they have to live on ?

    OAS/GIS/GAINS........? Could people survive on that income ?

    What do we do about people who "fall through the cracks" in our system ?

    I can see your heart in the right place, and you should be commended for it. However, there is a VAST difference between someone who struggled with a mental or physical ailment vs someone who didn't make money at a business and left the country. Question is, if Canada wasn't good enough for the OP's father back then, why is it any better now?

    The OP is probably in his 40s or 50s now, and should step up and help his dad out, instead of looking for a handout. I'm not trying to be offensive or cold hearted either, but let's get real.

  3. #13
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    If he was living and working here for 6 years, he may have some CPP benefits, unless his income was all off-book and unreported. But it won't be very much.

    Try starting here for CPP,OAS, GIS. https://www.canada.ca/en/services/be...cpensions.html

    I believe it is correct that after he has accumulated 10 years of residency he would qualify for OAS, but it will only be partial (25%) I think GIS is also pro-rated. So there is not likely to be any great bonanza coming.
    Last edited by OhGreatGuru; 2017-02-13 at 04:35 PM.

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  5. #14
    Senior Member sags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by STech View Post
    I can see your heart in the right place, and you should be commended for it. However, there is a VAST difference between someone who struggled with a mental or physical ailment vs someone who didn't make money at a business and left the country. Question is, if Canada wasn't good enough for the OP's father back then, why is it any better now?

    The OP is probably in his 40s or 50s now, and should step up and help his dad out, instead of looking for a handout. I'm not trying to be offensive or cold hearted either, but let's get real.
    I refrained from the moral judgement in my reply to the OP, although I did consider that his father is a Canadian citizen and is therefore entitled to any benefit available to him. I am wondering how the government decided that 10 years of residency in Canada should qualify someone to collect OAS as it seems a rather minimal requirement......but it is what it is.
    Last edited by sags; 2017-02-13 at 04:50 PM.
    Someone planted a tree a long time ago so I can sit in the shade.

  6. #15
    Senior Member sags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OptsyEagle View Post
    Economics 101:

    Give more money to the poor ... and you will get more people that are poor. If that is the objective, knock yourself out.
    There is a school of economic thought that giving money to poor people is a more effective strategy than continuing with a system where the majority of the wealth flows to 1/10th of 1% of the population.

    That is a topic for another day and isn't likely to change, at least in the US where billionaires have taken up residence in all the seats of power in the White House.
    Someone planted a tree a long time ago so I can sit in the shade.

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sags View Post
    I refrained from the moral judgement on my reply to the OP, although I did consider that his father is a Canadian citizen and is therefore entitled to any benefit available to him.
    I agree with you, but you also raised a great question about someone with disabilities that has lived their whole lives in Canada. I don't think you're gonna have too many people arguing against helping out someone legitimately in need of help.

  8. #17
    Senior Member sags's Avatar
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    Sorry, I edited my comment as you were replying.
    Someone planted a tree a long time ago so I can sit in the shade.

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sags View Post
    There is a school of economic thought that giving money to poor people is a more effective strategy than continuing with a system where the majority of the wealth flows to 1/10th of 1% of the population.

    That is a topic for another day and isn't likely to change, at least in the US where billionaires have taken up residence in all the seats of power in the White House.
    All I know is that in this case it seems that this individual could either stay in Hong Kong or come to Canada. Seems to me he is just looking to see who is the highest bidder before he decides. I suspect, with all our good hearted citizens like yourself, that Canada will win this bidding war, when compared to whatever he might be offered from China.

    I will repeat myself. If you give more money to the poor people, you will get more poor people. I wish it were not the case, but it is.

  10. #19
    Senior Member Daniel A.'s Avatar
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    If the son wishes to have his father here in Canada then he should be willing to support him its the right thing to do. I'm sure there are many Canadians that wish there was more help as they support/subsidize aging parents.

  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by sags View Post
    I refrained from the moral judgement in my reply to the OP, although I did consider that his father is a Canadian citizen and is therefore entitled to any benefit available to him. I am wondering how the government decided that 10 years of residency in Canada should qualify someone to collect OAS as it seems a rather minimal requirement......but it is what it is.
    As noted above, 10 years doesn't give you full OAS. The OAS is pro-rated based on number of years resident after age 18 / 40 years. 10 years is just to get anything, and it would only be 25% (10/40).


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