How did you do in 2016?
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Thread: How did you do in 2016?

  1. #1
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    How did you do in 2016?

    2016 was a very good year for the markets.

    I don't do any fancy return calculations, but our 40/60 Fixed Income/Equity retirement portfolio produced a simple return of 20%. By simple return, I mean (Final balance-Beginning balance+withdrawals)/Beginning balance = 20%.

    I am sure most of you did well too.


  2. #2
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    A good year is when you follow your method which gives you an edge & you make or lose money

    A bad year is when you don't follow your method & you lose money

    A real bad year is when you make money & don't follow your method

    2016 could only be a real bad year if you made money, the more money made the possibility of it being a real real bad year LOL

  3. #3
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    Not too bad vs my target. I wasn't at my target asset allocations and I struggled to get there. With the allocations I had, I ended up with 5.0% for the year.

    If I had been at my ideal permanent portfolio allocations, the year's return would have been ideally 5.5% so I only missed out on a bit. That's more or less in line with an average year for the PP. Details of my benchmark are in this post.

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  5. #4
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    For me this year was only my 2nd year since I began to learn about investing. My greatest gain was knowledge-wise. 2 years ago, I sat down with a bank person AKA SALESMAN and was sold a 2.2 MER mutual fund for my daughters RESP. I didn't even know what an MER meant, so I went home and begun to research. Soon after, I sold the mutual fund and bought the Mawer balanced fund. Then after a few months I sold that and got into ETF's. After reading a lot more, I decided my appetite for risk was greater and being young and able to take bigger risk, I sold those and bought some more risky stocks. The higher the risk, the greater the potential returns. If I lose a chunk, I am young and have many years left in the workforce and to start all over. I never really got anything financial-wise from my parents, and there will be no inheritance, graduated at 26 with 80K in debt, and worked hard with my wife and by God's grace paid it all off by the time I was 30. Now being 32, I'm 120K in the plus, and really looking forward to what 2017 can bring. I don't know about you guys, but I have a feeling this year will be amazing!

  6. #5
    Senior Member pwm's Avatar
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    All stocks, buy and hold strategy. Up 11.93%

  7. #6
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    Up 18.9 percent in the wife's portfolio, and 22.5 percent in mine. That is according to TDDI's performance metrics. Some of my better stock picks last year were Savaria which I got a double. And Canopy of course which was a four-bagger. My biggest dog by far was Grenville Strategic Royalty. I hung on way to long.

  8. #7
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    My simple couch potato portfolio was up 8.1%.
    The annualized money-weighted, and time-weighted returns were slightly higher at 8.3%.
    Couch potato journey-Hidden Content .
    Child's RESP-Hidden Content .

  9. #8
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    I don't keep detailed records but am up over 19% in then market including divies. Only TSX stocks with emphasis on Banks and utilities. Only 25% in the market and balance in interest bearing which probably yielded about 4%. The latter includes Savings, GIC's, MIC's, and a private loan.

  10. #9
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    Hi:

    Been a splendid year. Was a year of harvest, after 2 years of sowing. All years are splendid really, because if you lost money any particular year, you also likely bought something lowish to set up future gains.

    In 2016 I said goodbye to BCE, EMP.A, JNJ, LRE, and TRP. LRE went private in the end and managed to escape with all my fingers. The other 4 priced at the time I thought highish were mostly sold to raise funds for redeployment elsewhere where I figured I had a decent shot at buying lowish. The recent decline in the Canadian dollar also factored in the JNJ sale.

    No new companies were added to the portfolio. The year end holdings comprise 17 Canadian and 1 USA company, plus the mutual funds that came with my wife in her RRSP.

    ACO.X, BMO, and GE holdings were static.

    TECK.B had a net reduction, though multiple additions and sales.

    The following had net additions: BNS, BTE, BBD.B, CM, CWL, ECA, HSE, MFC, MX, OSB, POW. ECA had multiple sales too.

    Largest 6 holdings were 54% of portfolio year end 2016 for average weighting of 9%, 45% (7.5%) year end 2015.

    Debt was 23% net worth YE 2016, vs 29% YE 2015.

    Year end total indicated annual dividends 2016 $60,182, 2015 $38,405.

    Holdings in a loss position year end 2016, 1 at -5%; 2015, 9 ranging up to -48%. Reduced the ACB on 8 of the 9 holdings in a YE 2015 loss position.

    Goals going forward:

    Work the debt down in absolute dollars and as a percentage of net worth. My long term target has been 25%, but after a period of things going swimmingly, a lower number will leave me better prepared for whatever hits the fan next time. The good times don't last forever. Plus my wife will soon retire, so the ballast of an employment income will be gone (albeit replaced with a pension income).

    Reduce the big six holdings: BTE, MX, OSB, ECA, TECK.B, BBD.B. I like all these companies. I like them a lot. They are all in a transitory phase to some extent, but as and if good things happens with any of them, they will be sold down. Already started on TECK.B and ECA in 2016.

    As I reduce the big 6, I need to get back some balance in the rest of the portfolio, mostly in the utilities space, though I am reluctant to pay PE 18-20 for any of the usual suspects.

    Grow the portfolio yield in dollars and percentage terms. I like to aim for 3%, but well under that now due to extensive work of late in the no and low paying materials space. Some additional dividends may show up from TECK.B and OSB this year, but payments from the other 4 of the big 6 will likely be static.

    Get the TFSA fully funded, currently $25K of room. We don't really generate an employment surplus any more on one salary (actually 0.76 FTE now) and ever creeping up spending. So I must either take funds out of the RRSP; or contribute in kind, but the candidates both need to be free and clear of leverage for interest deductability reasons, and in a gain situation so I don't throw away a capital loss. Always been running a bit behind here, but this year I think I can close the gap.

    hboy54

  11. #10
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    2016 was a very good year. Had a bump from some bargains picked up in Feb. (banks/ins. cos.) and in June (int'l indexes).
    Equity portion returned 11.42%, including dividends.
    Total portfolio was up 8.39%

    Last year was a slightly losing year, so it certainly feels good.

    "That's what I do, I drink and I know things" - Tyrion Lannister

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