sample doctor's note for claiming line 306 - Page 2
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Thread: sample doctor's note for claiming line 306

  1. #11
    Senior Member carverman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzman View Post
    My parents and my sister just immigrated to Canada in 2016. They live with me in my home. This is the vert first time I will be filing taxes for my sister (i represent her).

    I do plan to have a doctor fill out T2201 Disability certificate. I agree that having T2201 Disability certificate is sufficient for line 306.

    My only concern is that since she is new to Canada and we do not have records/history of her mental illness from home country, the doctors might refuse to fill out T2201

    We will give it our best shot.

    Thanks
    Filling out B parts of the 9 page T2201 form requires a doctor to indicate and sign the form along with his practitioners stamp.
    This would be the section that may apply to your sister, I would think.
    Be aware it can take several weeks or even several months before you get an answer letter from CRA
    whether the application is approved or not. Until you get approval from CRA, you really can't claim
    the DTC amount. If you do, you could be subject to a re-assessment later.
    Mental functions necessary for everyday life – Medical doctor or psychologist
    Your patient is considered markedly restricted in performing the mental functions necessary for everyday life
    (described below) if, even with appropriate therapy, medication, and devices (for example, memory aids and adaptive
    aids):
    • he or she is unable or takes an inordinate amount of time to perform these functions by himself or herself; and
    • this is the case all or substantially all of the time (at least 90% of the time).

    Mental functions necessary for everyday life include:
    • adaptive functioning (for example, abilities related to self-care, health and safety, abilities to initiate and respond to
    social interactions, and common, simple transactions);
    • memory (for example, the ability to remember simple instructions, basic personal information such as name and
    address, or material of importance and interest); and
    • problem-solving, goal-setting, and judgment taken together (for example, the ability to solve problems, set and keep
    goals, and make the appropriate decisions and judgments).
    Note
    A restriction in problem-solving, goal-setting, or judgment that markedly restricts adaptive functioning, all or
    substantially all of the time (at least 90% of the time), would qualify.

    Is your patient markedly restricted in performing the mental functions necessary for everyday life, as
    described above?

    Yes No

    If yes, when did your patient's restriction in performing the mental functions necessary for everyday life
    become a marked restriction (this is not necessarily the year of the diagnosis, as is often the case with
    progressive diseases)?


    Last edited by carverman; 2017-01-08 at 11:05 AM.

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