Buying cheap land in Ontario
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Thread: Buying cheap land in Ontario

  1. #1
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    Exclamation Buying cheap land in Ontario

    We've found some inexpensive land not far away from "cottage country". It's such a good deal, and not far from relatives who know the area and specific plot of land well, so we are considering purchasing it. The taxes are so cheap it's almost a moot point.

    The only problem is it's boat access only. It's a bit of a gamble but a main road is less than 5 km's away, and we plan to buy and hold this property for at least 20 years then either build or sell.

    We also plan to plant hardwood trees on it that should be harvestable in 20 years or a bit more. This will help with our investment I'm sure.

    Has anyone else here done anything similar? Buy cheap (ie 10,000$ or less) property and hold onto it?


  2. #2
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    You get what you pay for. Taxes are higher if the property has road access, same for price.

    If you don't mind the boat access, and enjoy camping, then enjoy. It could be a great escape.

    By harvestable hardwood trees, I assume you mean that they would be logged for hardwood....how would you get the wood out in a boat?

  3. #3
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    Hardwood lumber in 20 years? I'm no lumberjack... but I got a 30 year old maple in my front yard that is only about 10" diameter. I would think it would need 40+ years for lumber size...

    What do you mean by it's a bit of a gamble? A gamble that they may/may not put a new road in?

  4. #4
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    My mother-in-law had a property that wasn't quite that cheap. She paid property taxes on it for 10-15 years and then sold it at a loss.

    There's no such thing as a good deal.
    Mike Holman
    Money Smarts Blog Investing and Personal Finance

  5. #5
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    Guys do you think wood lots are a good investment?

    For example I see 160 acres with road access 40 km north of Timmins for $29,000.

    I have no idea what hardwood is worth but a quick google search suggested it might be $2000/acre (seems kinda low?). So that 160 acres could yield $320,000 worth of wood in 30 years?

    Anyone knowledgeable about this topic?

  6. #6
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    Are you guys starting the next Sino-Forest, but this one actually sells lumber?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darisha View Post
    ...

    We also plan to plant hardwood trees on it that should be harvestable in 20 years or a bit more. ...
    What have you been smoking?

  8. #8
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    Image the raw sewage around making these trees grow super fast lol.My parents have 33 acres(part of 330 acre family owned land) and I am 45 years old.My Dad planted some trees about 26 years ago and definitely nowhere near cutting size .My grandfather also operated a saw mill that closed in 1960 ,these trees that have been left to grow the last 50 or so years are making great firewood but my Dad , Uncles and Cousins only harvest the sick and dying trees and do not allow any commercial cutting there.There is a big river going through the property so years ago they used booms like you may recall seeing on the old beachcomber series
    With no Road access not sure what the cost would be to even harvest the trees even if they grew at super rates .

  9. #9
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    marina there is a fabulous book/article/story to be created about this.

    does your family still have any photographs that date back to your grandfather's era ?

    and what do they do, what did they do, with the logs whether whole as today or cut to lengths in the ancient sawmill. Do they float them downriver in booms ? where to, the ocean ? and once in the sea, do tugboats chug in once a year to tow the booms to some larger commercial port down the coast ?

    and what about the work camps your grandfather must have maintained out there in the bush. Like, who did the cooking. And if there was no road in, how did they get the food in.

    sigh. These are always fabulous canadian frontier stories.

  10. #10
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    There is still demand for waterfront even if it is only accessible by boat. After all, there are many cottages on islands that are of course only accessible by boat. You should look into the planning permissions and see whether the property would be developable at some point down the road.


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